Texas Roofing Contractors, Industry Associations Assist with Hurricane Harvey Recovery Efforts


Texas Roofing Contractors, Industry Associations Assist with Hurricane Harvey Recovery Efforts

The roofing industry is responding to the humanitarian crisis unfolding in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Roofing contractors from around Texas and beyond are pitching in with financial pledges, donating equipment and actively participating in rescue and relief operations along the state’s eastern shoreline. An area spanning more than 250 miles between major population centers like Corpus Christi, Houston and Beaumont was saturated with an unprecedented amount of rain, estimated at more than 50 inches of since Harvey struck last weekend as a category 4 hurricane. So far, 31 deaths and many more injuries have been blamed on the storm, which already is expected to be among the most costly in terms of damage in American history.

Published at Thu, 31 Aug 2017 07:02:00 +0000


Loveland Innovations Awarded a Second Patent for Ground-Breaking Drone Technology


Loveland Innovations Awarded a Second Patent for Ground-Breaking Drone Technology

New patent in drone technology improves how aerial imagery can be used in capturing, identifying and estimating roof damage.

ALPINE, Utah – August 30, 2017 – Loveland Innovations®, maker of advanced drone solutions for the Property and Casualty Insurance Industry, announced today that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has awarded it a second patent. The new patent continues to illustrate Loveland Innovations’ fierce commitment to constantly improving drone technology for the Insurance industry. This patent advances the way that aerial imagery, used for the purposes of identifying and estimating roof damage, is captured. The approach positions the drone in a way that limits potential image distortion and lays the groundwork for further image capture techniques that will accelerate the use of aerial imagery in established Insurance workflows.

“Our team has 200+ combined years of experience in developing technology solutions for insurance,” says Jim Loveland, CEO and Founder of Loveland Innovations. “By drawing on this wealth of experience, and through listening to key industry players, we’re vastly improving the industry’s approach to capturing aerial images for the claims process in ways above and beyond advances in hardware. The speed in which we continue to receive patents from the USPTO is a tremendous testament to our unique skill set and incredibly innovative approach as a company.  This latest patent is one of many of our planned steps forward for insurance-focused drone solutions.”

The issuance of patent number 9,734,397 comes just a few months after Loveland Innovations’ first patent, which covers advanced image capturing techniques as well as in-app technologies that makes performing drone inspections simple for Insurance professionals. Together, these patents represent Loveland Innovations’ dedication to delivering the most advanced drone-based inspection solutions for the Property and Casualty Insurance industry.

For more information about Loveland Innovations and how it’s changing the way that roof and property inspections are done, visit www.lovelandinnovations.com

About Loveland Innovations
Loveland Innovations is the first company in the world to develop an autonomous drone inspection solution specifically for—and only for—Property and Casualty Insurance. With our patented technology in the hands of insurance carriers, adjusters, and contractors, claims, underwriting, or roof inspections can be done safely and in just a matter of minutes.

Published at Thu, 31 Aug 2017 17:11:08 +0000


MRCA Foundation Auction Fundraiser


MRCA Foundation Auction Fundraiser

Donating to the Foundation Auction is now easier than ever, click here to access the auction donation form.

This year the MRCA Foundation Auction Fundraiser will be held October 17th at 5:30 pm in the beautiful Crystal Ballroom of the Marriott St. Louis Grand. 

Remember – not only will hundreds of MRCA Members see your strong support of the Foundation, but the money raised from your donated item will go towards these important initiatives:

  • Roofing Industry Research
  • Industry-related Academic Scholarships for MRCA Members and their families
  • Educational Programming directed towards MRCA Members

The online auction site will feature all of the items that are donated.

Online bidding will be available before and during the actual event. Even those who can’t be there in person can still bid.

For questions please contact Megan Miller at mmiller@mrca.org or call 800-497-6722. 

The Foundation Board graciously thanks all of the donors for their support and generosity.
 

Published at Thu, 31 Aug 2017 12:00:00 +0000


MRA Will Host Seminars for Metal Roofing Contractors at METALCON


MRA Will Host Seminars for Metal Roofing Contractors at METALCON

The Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) has announced it will be hosting two seminars for metal roofing contractors at METALCON 2017.  Both are designed to help contractors grow their residential metal roofing businesses with advice and ideas that can make an impact. Led by metal roofing expert Frank Farmer, the MRA training sessions will be held on both Oct. 18 and 19, as follows:

Growing Your Residential Metal Roofing Company in the Age of Millennials

Hiring, Training and Turning Millennials into Rock Stars

  • While most companies are struggling with low productivity of a millennial workforce, your company can excel.  Understanding what the millennial generation wants and needs is the key to your growth and profitability. This seminar will share how to turn your company into a magnet that attracts people while developing a profitable company culture that millennials crave.
  • Presented Oct. 18, from 9:30 a.m – 10:30 a.m. and Oct. 19, from 10:45 – 11:45 a.m.

Increasing your Residential Metal Roof Company’s Profitability

  • Learn how to create value and urgency without being the lowest bid.  Frank will share sales techniques specific to the metal roofing industry, including how to become your customer’s first choice and make the order on the first visit at the price you want.
  • Presented Oct. 18, from 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. and Oct. 19, from 9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

For more information, and to register for the sessions, contractors can click here to review the conference schedule and choose a session.  MRA is also offering registration for the show floor at this link.   

Published at Wed, 30 Aug 2017 17:00:42 +0000


SRS Distribution Announces the Acquisition of National Building Supply


SRS Distribution Announces the Acquisition of National Building Supply

MCKINNEY, Texas — SRS Distribution announced the acquisition of National Building Supply Corporation, a family-owned distributor of residential building products with locations in Belleville, Roselle, and Dover, N.J.   

National Building Supply was founded in 1962 and currently employs a team of over 30 people. National covers a primary market area of Northern & Central New Jersey servicing professional contractors, local homebuilders, home improvement contractors, and remodelers. Tom Lazur, National’s current owner, and National’s entire sales and operations team will be staying with the company to run the branches going forward.  All National locations will continue to operate under that name and will become part of SRS’s family of independent distributors.    

Dan Tinker, president and CEO of SRS Distribution, commented, “We are very excited to have Tom and his great team join the SRS family.  We have had a long relationship with the Lazur family over the years through various supplier outings and industry gatherings.  One of the things we love about this industry is how many friends you make over time and decades later you get an opportunity like this to work together as partners.  The addition of National makes us exponentially stronger in New Jersey and also provides us with access to the CertainTeed Vinyl Siding line in the region.” 

Tom Lazur, owner and president of National, added, “I am pleased that I have found the right partner for the future of National and look forward to joining forces with my friends at SRS.  My family and I have owned and operated National as an independent distributor for almost 40 years, but felt it was time to find a partner that could help us grow the business and preserve our family’s legacy for decades to come.  Over the past several years, I have done my research on the market landscape and am confident without any doubt that SRS is the best possible partner for our family, our employees, and our customers.” 

For more information, visit www.srsicorp.com.

Published at Wed, 30 Aug 2017 12:00:00 +0000


BLUEFIN Announces Acquisition of CyberCon Consulting


BLUEFIN Announces Acquisition of CyberCon Consulting

GREENWOOD VILLAGE, Co. — BLUEFIN, LLC recently announced the acquisition of CyberCon Consulting, Inc. This transaction represents a significant opportunity to enhance the value both companies can deliver to their customers. CyberCon has a long history of providing the highest quality roof consulting services to a wide variety of customers such as Prologis, American Honda Motor Co., Southern California Edison, and the Denver International Airport. The entire CyberCon team will join BLUEFIN’s staff, and CyberCon’s owner, Nick Lovato, will become senior vice president of BLUEFIN.

“We are excited to welcome CyberCon to BLUEFIN,” said Richard Rast, BLUEFIN’s president. “I have admired CyberCon for many years while working in the industry and living in the community very close to their operations. We value their longstanding success, and we commit to providing their team of dedicated employees the resources they need to grow that success even further. Nick Lovato brings exceptional technical expertise to our management team, and I look forward to working closely with him to continue providing superior service to CyberCon’s customers.”  

Lovato commented, “CyberCon is very proud of the legacy we have established and nurtured over the past 26 years. We view today’s transaction as an opportunity to continue growing, and we welcome the chance to provide an expanded service offering to our clients. Culturally, this is an excellent fit for us, and we are excited for our future with BLUEFIN.”

For more information, visit bluefinllc.com.

Published at Fri, 25 Aug 2017 12:00:00 +0000


PetersenDean Roofing & Solar Selects GAF as Preferred Manufacturer of Cool Shingles


PetersenDean Roofing & Solar Selects GAF as Preferred Manufacturer of Cool Shingles

FREMONT, Calif. – Fremont, California-based PetersenDean Roofing & Solar announced its relationship with GAF, North America’s largest roofing manufacturer. The relationship will help supply PetersenDean consumers in all of its seven operating states with shingles that can be used to comply with Title 24 cool roof requirements.

GAF is an American owned company with headquarters in Parsippany, N.J., and more than 30 manufacturing facilities nationwide.  

“We selected GAF because they own an expansive network of manufacturing facilities and produce quality products that make the company a leader in the industry,” said Gary Liardon, president of US Consumer Division, PetersenDean Roofing & Solar. “With all of GAF’s plants based in the U.S., we are providing our customers with quality products and supporting American jobs. They also produce the popular shingle colors that our customers like and offer comprehensive warranties. We are proud to partner with such an innovative and dependable manufacturer.”

GAF is the only roofing manufacturer to earn the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval on its products. The company recently introduced its Timberline HD® Reflector Series™ Shingles, which can be used to comply with Title 24 cool roof requirements. Cool roofs reflect more sunlight and absorb less heat than traditional roofs to help keep your home cooler. Additionally, GAF offers its Timberline HD® Reflector Series™ Shingles in a large selection of colors with comprehensive warranties. The color selection and warranties will provide PetersenDean customers with choice, quality, and peace of mind.

“At GAF, we are committed to working with the best contractors in the industry,” said Todd Tarchalski, West area vice president of sales at GAF. “We couldn’t be more excited to work with PetersenDean, one of America’s largest and most trusted roofing and solar companies.”

The GAF products will be offered in all seven states where PetersenDean operates.

This relationship helps meet two important goals for PetersenDean, which installs about 2,000 solar and roof systems each month nationally: providing PetersenDean customers with quality, innovative roofing materials and supporting American jobs.

“We made a decision at PetersenDean to only source our products from manufacturing facilities in North America,” said Jim Petersen, president and CEO of PetersenDean Roofing & Solar. “That’s why we chose to utilize GAF, which owns multiple manufacturing facilities across the nation. We can help customers lower their electric bills, help the environment, and help the economy.”

PetersenDean is the nation’s largest privately held solar and roofing company and is known for its advanced solar system technology and its American-made solar and roofing products. PetersenDean’s Solar4America initiative supports American jobs, manufacturing, and energy independence by sourcing solar panels and all system components from domestic producers. The PetersenDean solar system includes Buy-American-Act-compliant panels, inverters, and racking installed by U.S. companies.  The relationship with GAF further highlights PetersenDean’s commitment to supporting American jobs.  

For more information,visit www.petersendean.com.

Published at Mon, 28 Aug 2017 12:00:00 +0000


SEBS Roof Coating System Designed for Use in Variety of Applications


SEBS Roof Coating System Designed for Use in Variety of Applications

Mule-HideThe new SEBS Roof Coating System from Mule-Hide Products Co. combines high tensile strength, excellent elasticity, ultra-low moisture permeability and resistance to ponding water, making it an ideal choice for use in a wide variety of challenging roof repair and restoration applications, according to the manufacturer.
 
The solvent-based coating system is designed primarily for use in repairing and restoring metal roofs, but also can be used on TPO, EPDM, asphalt, modified bitumen, Kynar, concrete, Hypalon and PIB roofing systems.
 
The SEBS Roof Coating System includes the following products: SEBS Primer; SEBS Base Coat; SEBS Roof Coating (for use on metal, TPO and Hypalon roofing systems); SEBS+ Roof Coating (for use on metal, TPO, Hypalon, EPDM, asphalt, modified bitumen, Kynar, concrete and PIB roofing systems); SEBS Seam Sealer; and SEBS 1 – Multipurpose Sealant.

The coatings’ solvent base and ultra-low moisture permeability enable them to outperform other coating types in ponding water applications, according to the manufacturer. They will not delaminate if the substrate becomes wet and, unlike water-based coatings, they will not re-emulsify during prolonged exposure to ponding water.

The lack of permeability also helps prevent corrosion of metal substrates and makes the coatings highly resistant to algae and fungi. Antioxidants and light stabilizers ensure the coating system’s durability throughout the roofing system’s service life.

Because the SEBS Roof Coating System is solvent-based, it cannot be shipped to areas that regulate the use of products containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). 

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 23 Aug 2017 13:00:15 +0000


Soprema to Host Building Envelope Clinics in California


Soprema to Host Building Envelope Clinics in California

Soprema Inc. will be hosting two regional Building Envelope Clinics in California in September 2017 for architects, consultants and contractors looking to further their knowledge, network and earn continuing education units.

The first clinic will be held in San Francisco on Sept. 19, at AIA San Francisco, located at 130 Sutter St. #600, San Francisco, CA 94104.

The second clinic will be held in Los Angeles on Sept. 21. The clinic will be held at the California Science Center, located at 700 Exposition Park Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90037

Both events include a Building Envelope Clinic that will begin at 9 a.m. and conclude at 3:30 p.m. with a cocktail reception and prize raffle.

“We’re proud to be offering these clinics regionally to help support our consultants, contractors and architects,” said Sara Jonas, Soprema. “These courses continue to bring education to the forefront for our current partners, as well as those new to Soprema, while helping them to achieve credits to keep their accreditations.”

For more information and to RSVP, visit the website.

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Published at Wed, 23 Aug 2017 13:00:35 +0000


Beacon Roofing Supply to Acquire Allied Building Products


Beacon Roofing Supply to Acquire Allied Building Products

Beacon Roofing Supply Inc. announced that the company has entered into an agreement to acquire Allied Building Products Corp. Beacon will purchase Allied from global diversified building products group CRH for $2.625 billion in cash.

Headquartered in Herndon, Va., Beacon is a distributor of residential and non-residential roofing and complementary building products, and the company currently has more than 380 locations in 48 states and six Canadian provinces.

Allied is headquartered in East Rutherford, N.J., and distributes products across 208 locations in 31 states. The company distributes exterior products, such as roofing, siding, windows and doors, and interior products, such as wallboard and suspended ceiling systems.

According to Beacon, the combination of Beacon and Allied will make Beacon one of the largest publicly traded wholesale building materials distributors in North America with pro forma revenues of approximately $7 billion and 593 branches in all 50 states and six provinces across Canada.

Beacon will also become the fourth largest wallboard and acoustical ceiling tile wholesale distributor in the United States, with more than $1 billion of revenue in the interior market category. Beacon and Allied have more than 150 years of combined experience providing service excellence to customers in the building products industry.

The expanded geographic footprint will allow Beacon to enter new local markets, particularly in New York, New Jersey and the upper Midwest. In addition, acquiring Allied allows Beacon to further strengthen the company’s position as a leader in roofing products distribution, while accelerating growth in other key product categories, including siding, windows, doors, decking, trim, waterproofing, insulation and solar.

Beacon expects to finance the acquisition with approximately $2.2 billion of debt financing, a new unsecured note and approximately $500 million of committed convertible preferred equity financing from an entity affiliated with the investment firm Clayton, Dubilier & Rice (CD&R), which in October 2015 sold Roofing Supply Group (RSG) to Beacon. The parties currently expect to consummate the transaction on or around January 2, 2018, subject to satisfaction of customary closing conditions.

Robert R. Buck, chairman of Beacon’s board of directors, stated: “Allied is among the most established and respected companies in our industry, and we are proud that, through this acquisition, Beacon will become one of North America’s largest publicly traded building materials distributors and will operate locations in all 50 states. I want to thank CRH for entrusting Beacon with the future success of Allied and its dedicated employees, who have been part of the CRH family for more than 20 years. The Allied acquisition also presents a great opportunity for CD&R to again become a major shareholder in Beacon. Today is of great significance in Beacon’s history and for the future of building products distribution.”

Paul Isabella, Beacon’s president and chief executive ffficer, commented: “I would like to welcome the more than 3,500 employees from Allied to the Beacon family. We are thrilled to partner with such a loyal and dedicated workforce that shares our commitment to superior customer service and high levels of performance. We are also excited to become a significant player in the robust, growing and still-consolidating interior products market. Together, we will leverage the strengths of both companies, while remaining committed to preserving the deep customer relationships that we have each cultivated over 150 years of combined experience. This is a milestone moment in the long and successful histories of both companies.”

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Published at Thu, 24 Aug 2017 20:15:20 +0000


Tennessee Association of Roofing Contractors Association Raises $14,000 to Aid Families Affected by 2016 Wildfires


Tennessee Association of Roofing Contractors Association Raises $14,000 to Aid Families Affected by 2016 Wildfires

CHL_4265 copyOn April 21, members of the Tennessee Association of Roofing Contractors (TARC) hosted a golf tournament in Gatlinburg, Tenn. to raise funds for Gatlinburg’s Mountain Tough Recovery Team (MTRT), a foundation set up through the East Tennessee Foundation to help families who lost homes in the wildfires that spread through the state in late 2016.

MTRT was created to aid and support families who were adversely affected by the fires on November 28, 2016, that burned 1,800 homes and caused $500 million in damage to the tourism industry.

“It’s important for TARC to support the businesses in Tennessee, especially in times of need,” says TARC past-president Robert Smith, Jr. “There are still families displaced by these fires and businesses yet to be rebuilt.”
In lieu of TARC’s Scholarship Fund, TARC held a special silent auction and reception after the golf tournament to raise funds for fire victims. Items auctioned included Gatlinburg weekend getaway packages donated by the Gatlinburg Visitors Bureau.

TARC exceeded its goal of raising $10,000 for the foundation, raising $14,000.

“The MTRT will utilize these funds to assist the fire survivors with various unmet needs from medical assistance, the replacement of items such as small appliances to be used for food preparation, and assistance with utility costs in temporary housing,” said MTRT board chair Ellen Wilhort.

“It was a touching experience,” Smith says. “To be able to be part of the rebuilding process in these people’s lives made the event worthwhile. We as an organization should be honored to have been able to lend a hand to those in need.”

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Published at Thu, 24 Aug 2017 20:28:46 +0000


Project Profile: Central Park High Rise, New York City Get New Modified Bitumen Roof System


Project Profile: Central Park High Rise, New York City Get New Modified Bitumen Roof System

The NYC 18-story co-op received a new Polyglass self-adhered, modified bitumen roof system as part of its renovation.

Located near Central Park in New York City, this 18-story co-op was renovated to include a new energy efficient 30-year roof system.  General contractor Wayne Bellet Construction selected Polyglass’ self-adhered, modified bitumen roof system for the re-roof project.  To ensure perfect installation, the crew closely monitored winter weather conditions and followed the product storage instructions. The multi-level 18,000 square-foot roof system was completed on schedule.

Project Requirements
The building owner required a Cool Roof Solution to maximize the energy efficiency of the building.  The capabilities of Polyglass’ roofing membranes with patented CURE® Technology and ADESO® Technology met the project requirements.  Membranes manufactured with CURE Technology have improved reflectivity, granule adhesion, UV and stain resistance and durability. In addition, membranes with ADESO Technology have an aggressive adhesive applied to the bottom side of the membranes enabling a fast and torch-less installation.

Roof System Components
Three-ply, self-adhered roof system with 30-year roof system warrantee featuring Polyfresko G SA and Elastoflex SA V. Polyfresko G SA is a highly reflective APP, self-adhered cap sheet with patented CURE and ADESO Technology. Polyfresko G SA is California Title 24 Compliant, listed with the Cool Roof Ratings Council and performs to ENERGY STAR® standards.  Polyfresko G SA was also used for the flashings, creating a seamless, watertight finish. Elastoflex SA V–a low temperature flexibility membrane designed for torch-less applications–was used for the base ply, interply and base flashings.

For more information on Polyglass roofing systems, visit www.polyglass.com

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Published at Thu, 24 Aug 2017 21:27:03 +0000


A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply Encourages Involvement and Support of Industry Associations


A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply Encourages Involvement and Support of Industry Associations

Industry associations promote the advancement of the roofing industry as a whole and offer valuable support for contractors.

Last month, A.C.T Metal Deck Supply enjoyed participating in the Chicago Roofing Contractors Association’s (CRCA) Annual Industry Golf Day. The company had a foursome of golfers participate and sponsored the beverage cart where they passed out peanut packs and free drinks to golfers.

A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply is proud to support the roofing industry’s various associations and encourages contractors to take advantage of the resources that membership provides. Members benefits from continuing education, from peer interaction and networking, from technical support and annual conferences to learn about new products and technologies in the industry.

Many associations offer special discounts for members on vehicle or equipment purchases, can provide access to better insurance rates or financing options for large purchases. Being a member doesn’t mean that you have to attend the meetings, though that is how you can take advantage of sharing best practices and learning from your peers. Many of the meetings feature experts that speak on topics that can help you better run your businesses.

Our industry associations also support the advancement of the roofing industry as a whole through lobbying and watching proposed legislation and regulation changes. In addition to the CRCA, A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply is proud to be an active member of the National Roofing Contractors Association, Carolina’s Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association, North East Roofing Contractors Association, Midwest Roofing Contractors Association, and Roofing Contractors Association of Texas. You can find links to all the associations right here on RoofersCoffeeShop.com on this page.

Learn more about A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply at www.metaldecksupply.com.

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Published at Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:29:01 +0000


Q&A with Vickie: Angie Hicks, co-founder of Angie’s List


Q&A with Vickie: Angie Hicks, co-founder of Angie’s List

Angie’s List has added free educational webinars and is increasing their presence at industry events in order to talk one-on-one with roofing contractors.

Recently, Vickie Sharples had the good fortune to ask Angie Hicks, co-founder of Angie’s List, a few questions.  We were curious to learn more about their new program changes and what advertising and marketing opportunities they had for the roofing community.  She graciously reviewed some of the resources Angie’s List is offering with us.

Vickie: You are reaching out to the roofing community with a different program than you had in the past. This new program seems to give more contractors greater opportunities on Angie’s List. How is this new format different from other lead and referral companies?

Angie: Angie’s List is distinct in three ways: high-quality members, trusted reviews, and strong brand recognition. Our members are overwhelmingly homeowners, and 88% of them hired a contractor in 2016, spending an average of $7,200.1

Our reviews are audited annually by a third-party vendor called BPA Worldwide, which helps to ensure that our review processes are fair and unbiased. Pros may not review themselves or their competitors, our reviews are never anonymous, and Pros have the chance to respond to reviews left on their business.

In addition to our members and reviews, Angie’s List is the home-service industry’s most recognized brand for customers looking for home-improvement services. Angie’s List has the highest awareness among home service companies – 94% of consumers recognize the Angie’s List brand.2

Vickie: We have seen resources such as free marketing webinars on your business center. What are some of the other things you are doing to help contractors, specifically roofing contractors?

Angie:  First, I’m glad you recognized our webinars. These are a relatively new initiative, and we’re excited to add value to a Pro’s interaction with Angie’s List. We’ve been in business with service companies for more than 20 years, and the webinars are a great way to share the expertise we’ve gained and help Pros grow their business. Our next webinar is August 23rd, and the topic is all about reviews. The goal is to help Pros become experts on collecting and responding to reviews so that they can increase their business’s exposure and communicate with their customers with ease.

In addition to the webinars, we’re increasing our presence at industry trade shows and hosting regional networking events for Pros across the country. For example, we recently held a networking event at TopGolf in Houston, Texas, where service pros could share best practices, learn from our own industry experts, play golf, and enjoy food and beverages, while getting to speak face-to-face with Angie’s List representatives. It was a lot of fun, both for the Angie’s List employees and for the Pros, and we look forward to meeting more of our customers across the country as we host more of these networking nights. Keep a lookout for our booth at your next trade show, and an eye on your email for a networking event in your area!

Vickie: We have noticed that you have listings of roofing contractors that are in your system ready for the owner of that company to claim his listing. The sign-up seems pretty painless. Can you tell us a little about the process and how it is working so far?

Angie: As soon as an Angie’s List member leaves a review for a service provider who isn’t yet listed on Angie’s List, we email that service provider to let them know they’ve earned their first Angie’s List review! Pros can follow the link in that email directly to a page where they can claim their business and start building their Angie’s List profile. We want to make it as simple as we can for service providers to officially register their company on Angie’s List, so even if they haven’t yet earned a customer review, but would like to build an Angie’s List profile and start collecting reviews, all a Pro would have to do is call 1-866-843-LIST or visit this link.

Vickie: Besides the listing opportunities, what other marketing resources does Angie’s list provide specifically for roofing contractors?

Angie: We actually have a number of opportunities for roofing contractors to get in front of our members. In addition to an online presence, Angie’s List offers advertising in our award-winning magazine, which is sent to members each month and offers the chance to stand out from the competition online. There’s also the opportunity to connect with members through our weekly emailed newsletter. Our Client Success Managers are adept at helping Pros determine and develop the best strategy to get the most value from Angie’s List resources and opportunities.

Vickie: If we are a contractor that uses Angie’s list do you provide insight into the responses submitted by homeowners?

Angie: Any Pro who is registered with Angie’s List has full visibility of all reviews left on their profile, as well as the ability to respond. Using this interaction between member/client and the Pro is a great opportunity to enhance a company’s brand by showcasing responsiveness, thoughtfulness, and caring.

Additionally, the Angie’s List Business Center now features a “Pro Dashboard” where Pros can see summary metrics of their Angie’s List profile performance, such as the number of recent reviews collected and the number of recent profile views they’ve received.

To learn more about Angie’s List, visit www.angieslistbusinesscenter.com/roofing

Sources:
Comparing internal data compiled from 7/5/2015 – 9/25/2016
Angie’s List External Brand Tracking Survey July 2017.

(Why?)

Published at Mon, 14 Aug 2017 19:48:05 +0000


Donating to the MRCA Foundation Auction is Now Easier than Ever


Donating to the MRCA Foundation Auction is Now Easier than Ever

Use the convenient online form to donate an item for the MRCA Foundation auction.

This year the MRCA Foundation Auction Fundraiser will be held October 17, 2017 at 5:30 pm in the beautiful Crystal Ballroom of the Marriott St. Louis Grand.

Remember – not only will hundreds of MRCA members see your strong support of the Foundation, but the money raised from donated items will go toward these important initiatives:

  • Roofing Industry Research
  • Industry-related Academic Scholarships for MRCA Members and their families
  • Educational Programming directed towards MRCA Members

The MRCA online auction site will feature all of the items that are donated. Online bidding will be available before and during the actual event!  Even those who can’t be there in person can still bid!

Click here to access MRCA’ auction donation form.

For questions please contact Megan Miller at: mmiller@mrca.org or call 800-497-6722.

The Foundation Board graciously thanks all of the donors for their support and generosity.

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Published at Wed, 16 Aug 2017 01:30:49 +0000


National Nail Introduces the STINGER® CH38-2 Cap Hammer with New Features That Enhance Fastening of House Wraps and Roofing Underlayments


National Nail Introduces the STINGER® CH38-2 Cap Hammer with New Features That Enhance Fastening of House Wraps and Roofing Underlayments

The newly upgraded CH38-2 Cap Hammer has been fine tuned for durability and performance.

National Nail’s STINGER® brand, which celebrates its 10th anniversary in 2017 as a leading brand of fastening tools for roofing underlayment and house wraps, introduces the newly upgraded CH38-2 Cap Hammer, fine-tuned for durability and performance.  The CH38-2 is an economical, non-pneumatic cap fastener that eliminates the hassle of hoses and compressors—which also improves safety.  Best practice applications for the CH38-2 which features the holding power of a 1-inch cap, includes house wrap, rolled insulation, and roofing felt.

The CH38-2 has been enhanced with increased internal handle strength, an improved staple design, track and spring, stronger welds and an added handle grip–all for maximum reliability and performance.

“The redesigned STINGER CH38-2 Cap Hammer is the perfect everyday solution for busy contractors that delivers the holding power of a cap and staple with the speed and ease of a hammer tacker,” said Roger Szotko, STINGER® Product Manager, National Nail.  “It gets the job done for a fraction of the cost of a pneumatic gun without the additional hassle and expense of a hose, compressor and power requirements.”

The CH38-2 Cap Hammer has a fastener capacity of 168 full, 1-inch collated plastic caps and 3/8 -inch crown staples.  To learn more about the newly enhanced, versatile CH38-2 at www.STINGERWORLD.com or call 1-800-746-5659.

About National Nail
National Nail Corp., headquartered in Grand Rapids, Mich., is an employee-owned manufacturer and distributor of high quality, innovative building products and service solutions for the residential and commercial construction industries. Other National Nail brands include Pro-Fit® (packaged, bulk and collated fasteners), and CAMO® (Edge Deck Fastening System; Premium Deck, Premium Trim, Composite, and Structural Screws).

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Published at Mon, 14 Aug 2017 23:58:34 +0000


RoofersCoffeeShop.com Welcomes Karen Edwards


RoofersCoffeeShop.com Welcomes Karen Edwards

Edwards has extensive experience in marketing and writing for the roofing industry.

RoofersCoffeeShop.com, the place where the industry meets for technology, information and everyday business is pleased to welcome Karen Edwards to its team where she will serve as editor.

As editor, Karen will oversee all content on the site, develop editorial guidelines and work with contributors to ensure that visitors to RoofersCoffeeShop.com continue to receive informative and engaging news and information.

A frequent contributor to many industry publications, Karen has written articles for Roofing Contractor, Florida Roofing, Professional Roofing, Western Roofing and Midwest Roofer Magazines. She co-authored the book Sales and Marketing for Roofing Contractors with Heidi Ellsworth.

Karen has a strong background in the roofing industry having held positions with EagleView Technologies, Carlisle Syntec and HJE Marketing.  She also works with roofing contractors and manufacturers as a marketing consultant through her company Casimir Group LLC.

She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Communications with a focus on public relations from Millersville University.

RoofersCoffeeShop.com is proud to welcome her to the team.

About RoofersCoffeeShop.com
RoofersCoffeeShop.com is committed to being a roofing professional advocate by supplying consistent information, education and communication avenues for all roofing professionals, and especially contractors, while promoting the positive growth, education and success of the roofing industry overall. Visitors to the site continue to find excellent opportunities for sharing information while participating in important ongoing conversations concerning new technologies, safety and the overall roofing trade. From the rooftop to the board room, RoofersCoffeeShop.com is “Where the Industry Meets!” For more information, visit www.rooferscoffeeshop.com.

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Published at Mon, 14 Aug 2017 14:47:21 +0000


How Do You Handle Employee Side Jobs?


How Do You Handle Employee Side Jobs?

This month’s topic has been a subject of discussion for years around the RoofersCoffeeShop.com.  Read this lively discussion on our Forum linked Here from 10 years ago and you will see this challenge is still relevant today.  Many of today’s contractors started out doing work on the side so this a very important topic to address for your business.

Please follow along to see these great ideas and policies presented from our Roofing Influencers.

About RCS Roofing Influencers
RoofersCoffeeShop.com is proud to present an exciting new way to approach today’s challenges in the roofing industry – RCS Roofing Influencers! We have created this group with people from various areas of expertise and asking them all for an opinion, tips or advice.  Our readers can get the insight on the subjects that best fits their business.  Please join our new group on Linkedin or Here on RoofersCoffeeShop.com

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Published at Mon, 14 Aug 2017 11:44:35 +0000


Call for Presentations at the Western Roofing Expo 2018


Call for Presentations at the Western Roofing Expo 2018

Attention all public speakers – submit your proposal to speak at the Western Roofing Expo 2018 before November 15.

With the ever-increasing popularity of the Western Roofing Expo and its educational seminars & demos, WSRCA is making a call to all members: apply to teach a seminar at the upcoming Western Roofing Expo 2018 in Las Vegas! They believe the quality of their membership provides a valuable knowledge base to tap into, driving even more relevance and learning opportunities for attendees.

Use this link to access the “Call for Presentations” e-form.  If you have a product or service appropriate for an audience of roofing contractors (averaging 65 attendees per seminar this last year), then you are encouraged to submit your seminar topic, with all relevant details asked on the application form.  Once received, the WSRCA Convention Committee will evaluate and select the top 16 applicants for presentation at this coming year’s Expo — June 10-12, 2018 — at the Paris Las Vegas.

There are several categories and target audiences from which to choose.  However, if your product or service falls outside these categories, please send your form in for review regardless. It may still end up being included.

With all the promotion, including print, emails, vendor distribution, etc., your company will find the exposure well worth the investment of time and energy.  Also, it will continue to boost the educational value that is growing at the Western Roofing Expo; producing some of the most professional, informed roofing contractors in the country.  Educated contractors are good for everyone.

WSRCA looks forward to receiving your application no later than 11/15/2017. Please fill out all information on the form.  Incomplete forms will not be considered. Click here to download the form, when finished, click SUBMIT FORM at the top of the document to return the completed form. If you’re having trouble submitting the form, you can also email it to Joel Viera – WSRCA Director of Exposition & Events, at joel@wsrca.com.

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Published at Fri, 11 Aug 2017 22:13:12 +0000


Cool Roofs are a Compelling Choice in the North


Cool Roofs are a Compelling Choice in the North

Dark Roof’s Summer Cooling Penalty is a Deciding Factor

Cool roofs reflect the sun’s energy and reduce air conditioning loads in the summer, so do dark roofs absorb energy in the winter and reduce heating costs? In northern regions where heating costs are significant, can dark roofs be energy efficient? Some building professionals specify dark absorptive membranes for northern cities like Chicago and Minneapolis believing that they are lowering their clients heating costs and lowering year round energy costs.

An analogy, only slightly tongue in cheek, would be to ask if Chicagoans walking along Michigan Avenue in the winter wear dark clothes to stay warmer? Or do dark colored cars outsell light colors in the Windy City?

So, do dark roofs help improve building energy efficiency in northern cities? Let’s take a look at the arguments.

Heating Degree Days versus Cooling Degree Days

There is no doubt that heating degree days in northern areas are far greater than cooling degree days. For example:

Cooling Days

This means that the number of days the temperature was below 65°F multiplied by how many degrees the temperature was lower, was 9,317. This far outnumbers the cooling degree days and some have argued that therefore dark roofs are appropriate for northern cities such as Minneapolis. However, it’s important to examine the cost of cooling versus the cost of heating.

Energy Costs

Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration for commercial customers in Minnesota in 2015 allows us to compare the cost of heating versus cooling. Assuming gas as the energy source for heating:

BTUs

Added to this, cooling is less efficient than heating. This means that one can’t simply compare the number of heating versus cooling degree days to make a judgment.

Verdict

Degree day comparisons don’t enable a choice of roof reflectivity to be made. Put simply, neither EPDM nor TPO / PVC can be specified on the basis of the number of heating degree days versus those of cooling degree days.

Cooling versus Heating Costs

Heating – Gas Costs

Natural gas is becoming ever more plentiful in the US and costs are fairly stable meaning that heating costs can generally be budgeted for with confidence. Added to that, utilities usually charge commercial customers a flat amount per cubic foot used. Frequently, volume discounts apply and larger customers pay less per BTU of heat than smaller ones.

Cooling – Electricity Costs

Today’s electric bills, especially for commercial and industrial customers, are fairly complex. However, the basic components are as follows:

  • Base Use Rate – the charge per kilowatt hour (kWhr) of energy use.
    • This is common for residential but rare for commercial customers.
    • Can vary depending on the time of year, eg. summer versus winter.
  • Time of Use Rate – the charge per kWhr of energy use that varies depending on the time of day or year.
    • This is increasingly applied to commercial customers.
    • The rate is highest during times of peak demand, such as between 1 and 6 pm. It is lowest during periods of low demand such as 3 to 6 am.
    • If the rate varies by time of year, then summer rates might be highest, when air conditioning use is at its highest.
  • Demand Charge – the cost per kilowatt (kW) of power demand.
    • The charge applies to the highest demand that a customer had for power at any time during a month.
    • To help understand the concept, think of how fast an electric meter is spinning when a lot of equipment is turned on and the air conditioning is running at maximum load. This might be the situation for a short period of time, so energy use could be low, but the power demand could be very high for that short period.
    • It is typically based on the highest power draw seen in 15 minute increments during a month.

All of these components make building electric charges difficult to predict and budget for. Plus, unlike for gas, higher usage levels can dramatically increase the cost of that energy.

Most building professionals clearly understand the impact of the base electric rate or tariff and time of use rates. It is easy to appreciate that lowering air conditioning demand will reduce electric bills. However, those tariffs frequently represent 50% or less of a total electric bill with the demand charge being 50% or larger. By understanding the impact of air conditioning on demand charges, it can be seen that cool roofs have a large role to play impacting building energy efficiency.

Demand Charges

A simple way to think of demand charges versus energy use is to look at an electric meter:

How to read your meter

In a traditional residential meter shown on the left, the upper dials keep track of the cumulative energy use. The lower wheel shows the demand by how fast it is spinning. A more modern or small commercial meter shown on the right displays the same data in a digital fashion.

As an air conditioner does its work during a month, the energy use is added up, leading to an eventual charge based on kilowatt hours. But, on the hottest day of that month, during an afternoon period when the sun was at its highest and creating a higher thermal load through the roof and walls the air conditioner will be operating at a high load. Therefore its “demand” for power will spike and that spike will result in a charge per kW. Even if that spike is for just 15 minutes, that demand charge could be >50% of the monthly bill. Let’s look at a small office building to better understand this:

The customer has a 2 ton air conditioner that draws 7.2kW at maximum load. Each month it runs at an average 50% load for 10 hours a day with an electric charge of $0.090/kWh. That results in a monthly charge of 10 hours x 30 days x 7.2kW x 50% x $0.090/kWhr = $97.20

But, on a sunny day during that same month, the air conditioner might run at maximum load for 15 minutes, triggering a demand charge of $15.00 / kW. The resulting demand charge would be 7.2 kW x $15.00 / kW = $108.00

In this example the demand charge is larger than the use charge. Since dark roofs increase the need for air conditioning, they not only drive up monthly electricity consumption costs, they can significantly increase demand charges, as well.  A cool roof, on the other hand, reflects heat away and helps reduce both monthly consumption and demand charges.

Verdict

Not only is electricity more expensive than gas, but the rate structures are complex. Seemingly small increases in electricity use can result in large additional costs due to the compounding effects of time of use rates and demand charges.

Cool roofs lower a building’s energy use, thereby lowering operating costs. However, overall electric use is often only 50% of the electric charge and the maximum power draw and its demand charge can represent the other half. Cool roofs lower the internal temperature rise on hot sunny days and therefore lower the load on air conditioning equipment.

Location Doesn’t Matter!

As the following data indicates, it doesn’t matter where a building is located; if it uses air conditioning then converting to a cool roof will result in savings.

Let’s compare buildings in the northern, southern, eastern, and western U.S. The basic assumptions are:

Size: 100,000 sq.ft.
Electric use cost: $0.090 / kWhr.
Electric demand cost: $15.00 / kW
Gas cost: $0.80 / therm

To make the calculations conservative, we assumed a high insulation level of R-30, a heater efficiency of 80%, and an air conditioner coefficient of performance of 3.2. Using the Cool Roof Calculator tool, we estimated the impact of converting from a dark roof to a reflective membrane in the following locations:

Region City Savings
Southern USA Houston, TX $5,200 / yr
Northern USA Minneapolis, MN $2,600 / yr
Western USA San Francisco, CA $2,400 / yr
Eastern USA Raleigh, NC $4,100 / yr

Verdict

In warm and hot regions, cool roofs provide for larger energy savings, however, even in more moderate and even northern climates cool roofs improve a building’s energy efficiency. Modeling shows this to hold true so long as a building uses gas to heat and has air conditioning.

Will a Cool Roof Always Result in Actual Cost Savings?

There are a few reasons why some may not receive lower electric bills after converting to cool roofs. For example, overall electric costs may rise year over year or the utility rate structure could change. Also, changes in the building’s use, equipment, or operating patterns could increase overall lower consumption. Suffice to say, modeling shows that cool roofs reduce the impact of solar energy on a building and several case studies have demonstrated reduced utility bills. But, each building is unique and should be evaluated on its own terms.

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Published at Tue, 08 Aug 2017 20:41:01 +0000


RCMA Is Accepting Abstracts for International Roof Coatings Conference


RCMA Is Accepting Abstracts for International Roof Coatings Conference

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) is now accepting abstracts for its fourth biennial International Roof Coatings Conference (IRCC) program. The deadline for submission of abstracts is Oct. 31, 2017. 
 
The 2018 IRCC will take place July 23-26, 2018, at the Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park, in Chicago. The conference will feature a host of networking opportunities, educational sessions, and other programming geared toward professionals involved in the roof coatings industry.  
 
“Our last conference was a success, with an over 40 percent growth in attendance,” says Jared Rothstein, RCMA Industry Affairs Manager. “We expect that the 2018 IRCC will provide more opportunity for our industry to join together, discuss issues, consider emerging trends, and enjoy each other’s company.”
 
Possible conference presentation topics include global market developments, green building trends, application practices, energy cost savings evaluations, roof coating formulation advancements, roof systems analysis, and in-situ field research. Roofing industry professionals, building envelope technology experts, material scientists, and those in the design community are encouraged to submit their abstracts for consideration.
 
Those interested in presenting at the 2018 IRCC should visit the IRCC website for more information and to complete the abstract submission form.  A list of conference partnership, sponsorship, and exhibition opportunities is also available on the IRCC website. 

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Published at Fri, 04 Aug 2017 21:00:01 +0000


RoofersCoffeeShop.com Welcomes DaVinci Roofscapes


RoofersCoffeeShop.com Welcomes DaVinci Roofscapes

DaVinci Roofscapes uses state-of-the-art polymer chemistry to manufacture beautiful, durable composite roofing tiles.

RoofersCoffeeShop.com, the place where the industry meets for technology, information and everyday business, is pleased to welcome DaVinci Roofscapes as its first composite roofing manufacturer partner.  DaVinci Roofscapes is a leading manufacturer of award-winning composite roofing products that are manufactured to overcome the natural weaknesses of stone slate and wood shake.

The company offers its traditional DaVinci Slate® and DaVinci Shake® along with single-width Bellaforté Slate® and Bellaforté Shake® products. With 49 standard colors available, DaVinci’s revolutionary composite roofing tiles offer homeowners and contractors the authentic colors and natural textures of quarried slate, hand-split cedar or machine-sawn shakes. In addition, homeowners and contractors can choose from a selection of DaVinci EcoBlend® cool roof colors that meet the stringent requirements of Title 24 for California residents.

All DaVinci products are backed by a Lifetime Limited Warranty which assures that the product will stand the test of time, providing beauty and durability for decades.

RoofersCoffeeShop.com is proud to welcome DaVinci Roofscapes.

About DaVinci Roofscapes
The experienced team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture industry-leading composite slate and shake roofing systems with an authentic look and superior performance. DaVinci leads the industry in the greatest selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s reliable products have a lifetime limited warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci high-performing roofing products are proudly made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council. For information call 1-800-328-4624 or visit www.davinciroofscapes.com.

About RoofersCoffeeShop.com
RoofersCoffeeShop.com is committed to being a roofing professional advocate by supplying consistent information, education and communication avenues for all roofing professionals, and especially contractors, while promoting the positive growth, education and success of the roofing industry overall. Visitors to the site continue to find excellent opportunities for sharing information while participating in important ongoing conversations concerning new technologies, safety and the overall roofing trade. From the rooftop to the board room, RoofersCoffeeShop.com is “Where the Industry Meets!” For more information, visit www.rooferscoffeeshop.com.

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Published at Thu, 03 Aug 2017 15:14:41 +0000


PPG Brochure Highlights 50 Years of Duranar Coatings for Metal Building Components


PPG Brochure Highlights 50 Years of Duranar Coatings for Metal Building Components

PPG has published “The Gold Standard in Architectural Metal Coatings: Celebrating 50 Years of DURANAR Coatings,” a 16-page brochure commemorating the 1967 introduction of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) coatings for metal building components.
 
According to Brian Knapp, PPG director, coil and building products, the booklet illustrates the historical significance of Duranar coatings.
 
“Our PVDF coating was a product that enabled architects to design metal components and facades with color,” he explains. “Until we introduced Duranar coatings, anodized aluminum was virtually the only metallic option to provide long-term performance on monumental buildings. It wasn’t until Duranar coatings were specified for several major projects that architects and building owners felt comfortable considering color finishes as a design option for metal.”
 
Over the past half-century, Duranar coatings have been specified by architects to protect and enhance some of the world’s most recognized architectural landmarks. Buildings profiled in the brochure include the Empire State Building in New York, Shanghai Tower in China, The Louvre Pyramid in Paris, and Centre Videotron in Quebec City.
 
Other prominent landmarks finished with Duranar coatings include One World Trade Center in New York; Shanghai World Financial Center in China; Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.
 
The brochure is organized by building type—skyscrapers, landmarks, convention centers, transportation facilities, libraries and sports venues. Each building profile includes photographs, location, approximate opening date, the selected Duranar coatings color and the architect’s name.
 
In addition to publishing the brochure, PPG will highlight Duranar coatings in trade-show displays throughout the year and offer special customer promotions and giveaways. A dedicated web portal, duranar50.com, features images and descriptions of other landmark buildings finished with Duranar coatings, as well as articles, white papers and additional educational materials.
 
To learn more about the 50th anniversary of Duranar coatings or to download a copy of the 50th anniversary brochure, visit here or call (800) 258-6398.
 

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Published at Wed, 02 Aug 2017 18:00:37 +0000


Miami-Dade County and ARMA Team Up to Update High-Wind Codes


Miami-Dade County and ARMA Team Up to Update High-Wind Codes

ARMA awarded the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award.

ARMA awarded the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award. Aaron R. Phillips, Corporate Director of Technical Services at TAMKO Building Products and chair of the ARMA Codes Steering Group, presented the award to Michael Goolsby and Miami-Dade team members who worked on the project. Pictured at the ceremony are (from left) Eduardo Fernandez, Gaspar Rodriguez, Michael Goolsby, Aaron Phillips, Alex Tigera and Jorge Acebo.

In the aftermath of 1992’s Hurricane Andrew, the entire building code for South Florida was rebuilt from the ground up. When it was launched in 1994, the South Florida Building Code was a groundbreaking document that set new roofing application standards and testing protocols for every component and system in the building envelope. More than two decades later, it was clear the building code for Miami-Dade County’s high-velocity hurricane zone (HVHZ) needed to be updated. Beginning in 2014, Miami-Dade County officials worked with the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) and others in the roofing industry to ensure the current code language was clear and up to date.

Two-and-a-half years later, their work is complete. The 2017 Florida Building Code is scheduled for implementation on Jan. 1, 2018, and it will include every one of the proposals and public comments jointly submitted by ARMA and Miami-Dade. As a result of this successful collaboration, ARMA presented the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department with the inaugural ARMA Public Partnership Award in 2017 for their work together in updating the building codes for the HVHZ.

Members of the joint task force on the project shared their thoughts on the experience with Roofing, including Mike Fischer, ARMA’s Vice President of Codes & Regulatory Compliance; Michael Goolsby, Miami-Dade Board and Code Administration Division Director; Jorge Acebo, Roofing Product Control Examiner; Alex Tigera, Roofing Product Control Examiner; and Gaspar Rodriguez, Code Compliance and Training Officer, Roofing.

They all believe this collaboration between industry and government could serve as a successful model for other industry trade associations and other code bodies to follow. “This kind of cooperation between a public regulator and a private trade association is rare enough,” says Fischer. “The overwhelmingly positive results are unprecedented.”

The Problems

Miami-Dade staff and ARMA representatives both saw shortcomings in the roofing requirements for HVHZ. There were outdated references that needed to be removed, including test standards that were out of date. This often resulted in questions that slowed down the product approval review process. Members of the roofing industry also wanted to explore coordinating the Miami-Dade HVHZ protocols with other national testing requirements to further streamline testing procedures.

Fischer summed up ARMA’s goals this way: “ARMA is a responsible advocate for the asphalt roofing industry. We take that role seriously. We are an advocate. Our job is to represent the collective interests of the producers, but we try to be responsible about it. And it’s that drive to be responsible which led us to this partnership with the Miami-Dade staff.”

At the first meeting between ARMA and Miami-Dade, Fischer tried to break the ice. “The first thing we said when we came into that meeting was, ‘Hi, we’re from industry and we’re here to help,’” Fischer recalls. “I will tell you that when we started that meeting in the morning, the Miami-Dade staff was probably skeptical of what we were there for. By the end of the day, we had laid out a project plan of how we were going to work together, and that set the tone for the rest of the project.”

Fischer knew it would take the two entities working together to get things done. “In the Florida process, we knew we had to work with Miami-Dade, as they are a key stakeholder. We brought in other roof covering manufacturers for some of the discussions, and we also talked to the FRSA, the Florida Roofing and Sheet Metal Association—the contractors—so they were at the table for quite a bit of this as well.”
ARMA set up a special task group to focus on the Miami-Dade protocols. The task force went through documents one by one with members of Miami-Dade group, identifying problems and sections that were out of date. They hashed out compromises when they didn’t agree.

Protecting the Public

Goolsby worked on the project on behalf of Miami-Dade along with members of his team including Acebo, Tigera and Rodriguez. “We cover a lot of territory,” notes Goolsby. “We maintain the building code and write the building code, but we also oversee all of the contractor licensing in Miami-Dade County. We have about 15,000 local licensed contractors. Of course, we handle product approvals, and we also service all of the boards here. We have a board of rules and appeals. We also oversee 35 building departments throughout Miami-Dade County. We try to make sure the code is uniformly enforced in all of those jurisdictions. So, we cover a lot of bases.”

The top priority is protecting the public. “In a general sense, we provide for the health, safety and welfare of the public,” Goolsby says, “But it’s these issues of life safety that are the most critical.”
Evacuating South Florida is difficult, so the residential portions of the code were written under the assumption that many people might have to ride out a storm in their homes. “We wanted their home to be just as strong as any commercial structure,” says Goolsby.

Acebo notes that ensuring the code is properly followed is as crucial as the code itself. He believes the inspectors’ role includes reassuring homeowners that systems are being installed correctly. “It’s important to us to fulfill our role to provide independent corroboration that the work is being done and installed properly,” he says. “The great thing about this particular effort is that it was truly collaborative. It was great to work with them and establish the language that was common with other jurisdictions or other certification agencies.”

Promising Results

Members of the joint task force agree that the changes make the code easier to understand. They also should streamline product approvals process.

“These updates definitely help the manufacturers get through the product approval process, specifically for Miami-Dade HVHZ requirements,” Fischer states. “It also helps the roofing contractor because we made sure the documents have the installation language updated, so it gives better direction to the installers of the products. And that trickles up to the general contractors in new construction, as it speeds up their processes and takes out some burdens.”

“At the end of the day, as a responsible advocate, one of ARMA’s main motivators was to make sure their industry’s products get installed the way they are intended to be installed,” Fischer continues. “That benefits the end user—the building owner and building occupant.”

Acebo agrees that the approvals process helps everyone—homeowners, contractors, manufacturers and inspectors. “If questions come out of the field from homeowners, manufacturers or contractors as to whether something is being applied or used properly, we can serve as that independent third party that doesn’t really have a stake in it other than to serve as an arbitrator who can clearly indicate whether something is right or not according to what has been provided and tested.”

The collaboration was so successful that the task force is already looking at other changes in the future. The Miami-Dade code is used as a model for other code bodies, and the joint task force could serve in that role as well, according to Fischer. “This is a model of collaboration between a governmental agency and private industry groups that will serve us well,” he says. “We are going to continue to do this with other groups, and frankly we’re going to continue doing it with Miami-Dade because this process isn’t ever done. Things will always be changing and we always have to keep up to date.”

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Published at Mon, 31 Jul 2017 19:00:16 +0000


SBS System Delivers Roof Design for the Brewery District


SBS System Delivers Roof Design for the Brewery District

Brewery District Building 3, New Westminster, B.C., Canada

Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories.

Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories.

The Brewery District is a dynamic, progressive area in in Metro Vancouver offering a mix of residential high-rises, shops and office buildings. The Brewery District provides quick access to the area and is connected via a SkyTrain to public
plazas, greenways, view decks, cycling paths, and a central community green gathering place. This master-planned community includes groceries, pharmacies, restaurants and other mixed-use retail outlets.

Roof Report

The project included roof areas of varying heights totaling approximately 21,320 square feet. Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories. IKO was able to meet their expectations with an SBS system using IKO TP 180 Granular Cap in a pattern of multiple colors. The IKO SBS Roofing System was recommended by GRC Columbia Roofing Inc., based on the specific client requirements to create a colorful rooftop pattern.

Team

Client/Owner:Wesgroup Properties
Architect/Designer:
Henrizquez & Partners Architects
Roofing Contractor:GRC Columbia Roofing Inc.
The Roof System:
IKO MVP Vapour Barrier
IKO MF 95 SF (Poly/Sand) Vapour
Barrier
IKO Therm III Insulation
IKO 3/16-inch Protectoboard
IKO TP 180 FF Base Sheet
IKO TP 180 SF Base Sheet
IKO TP 180 Granular Cap Sheet

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Published at Mon, 31 Jul 2017 21:00:27 +0000


Flagship Store Is Topped with Metal Roofing Panels


Flagship Store Is Topped with Metal Roofing Panels

Made In America Store: Elma, N.Y.

Dutch Seam, continuous standing seam metal roof panels, eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

Dutch Seam, continuous standing seam metal roof panels, eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

Mark Andol is the owner and founder of General Welding and Fabricating, with locations in Elma and Rochester, N.Y. That business, which manufactured structural and decorative steel components for this store, has been operating since 1989. When the recession hit almost 10 years ago, Andol lost much of his business to companies located overseas, forcing him to cut his workforce to half its size. At that point, he began envisioning a store that would only carry products that are 100 percent American made, to help grow manufacturing within the United States. Andol’s vision became a reality in 2010 when he opened the doors to the first Made in America store in Elma.

Roof Report

The mission of the Made in America Store is to create and save jobs in the United States by increasing American manufacturing. By installing ATAS’ Dutch Seam metal roofing panels, which are made in America, on this new flagship store, it only further reinforced this mission. Dutch Seam, a continuous standing seam metal roof panel, features an integral lock and seam which prevents “blow-off” or “creeping” of the seam. It also eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

When ATAS International announced the company’s 2016 Project of the Year winners at an awards banquet on May 8, the Made In America flagship store project took first place in the commercial roofs category.

Team

Architect:Lydon Architectural Services, Buffalo, N.Y.
General Contractor:Kulback’s Construction Inc., Lancaster, N.Y.
Installing Contractor:Bayford Construction, Lancaster, N.Y.
Roof System Manufacturer:ATAS International, Allentown, Pa.

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Published at Mon, 31 Jul 2017 20:00:34 +0000


RoofersCoffeeShop.com Welcomes Roofing Underlayments Companies G.A.P. Roofing, Inc. and GMC Roofing & Building Paper Products, Inc.


RoofersCoffeeShop.com Welcomes Roofing Underlayments Companies G.A.P. Roofing, Inc. and GMC Roofing & Building Paper Products, Inc.

The company makes premium roofing underlayments with fast delivery times and competitive pricing.

RoofersCoffeeShop.com, the place where the industry meets for technology, information and everyday business is pleased to welcome G.A.P. Roofing, Inc and GMC Roofing & Building Paper Products, Inc. These two “sister” companies are leading manufacturers of premium roofing underlayments as well as other unique building envelope products.  The two companies have been family owned and operated for over 25 years.  G.A.P. Roofing’s primary markets run from the Rocky Mountains all the way to the east coast, while GMC Roofing’s territory operates west of the Rockies to the west coast.

By using raw materials from their own paper mills, G.A.P. and GMC Roofing ensure that they have full control over quality and product performance. They offer over 25 products including ASTM rated saturated felts, synthetic underlayments, roll roofing and a variety of specialty products.  The new peel and stick (SBS modified) WaterGuard line features a unique granular Rain and Ice (no Selvedge edge!), AMT (Architectural Metal and Tile) SBS Modified designed for high temperature applications, and SBS Modified Cap and Base sheets.

Both teams of experienced sales professionals understand the roofing industry and are always available to help customers. Whether it’s selecting the right products or answering technical questions, the G.A.P. and GMC Roofing teams provide great customer service while standing behind all of their North American made products. Contractors receive a quality product at a competitive price.

RoofersCoffeeShop.com is proud to welcome G.A.P. Roofing, Inc. and GMC Roofing & Building Paper Products, Inc.

About G.A.P. Roofing, Inc. and GMC Roofing & Building Paper Products, Inc.
G.A.P. Roofing, Inc. is a leading manufacturer of premium roofing underlayments. It was founded by the Passmore family in 1990 when they leveraged their roofing industry experience and started Great Asphalt Products in Pryor, Oklahoma. The company owns its own paper mills and processes, with the belief that utilizing unique raw material formulations and greater attention to product standards and consistency, achieves a better product, lessens lead times and allows for meeting demand when natural disasters arise. GAP Roofing’s headquarters and manufacturing site is located in Pryor, OK and they operate a manufacturing and distribution site in Jasper, FL.  GMC Roofing’s headquarters and manufacturing site is located in Shafter, CA.  For more information, visit www.gaproofing.us  or www.gmcpaper.com

About RoofersCoffeeShop.com
RoofersCoffeeShop.com is committed to being a roofing professional advocate by supplying consistent information, education and communication avenues for all roofing professionals, and especially contractors, while promoting the positive growth, education and success of the roofing industry overall. Visitors to the site continue to find excellent opportunities for sharing information while participating in important ongoing conversations concerning new technologies, safety and the overall roofing trade. From the rooftop to the board room, RoofersCoffeeShop.com is “Where the Industry Meets!” For more information, visit www.rooferscoffeeshop.com.

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Published at Mon, 31 Jul 2017 12:58:13 +0000


Hot-Air Welding Under Changing Environmental Conditions


Hot-Air Welding Under Changing Environmental Conditions

The robotic welder’s speed, heat output and pressure should be properly programmed before the welding process begins. Photo: Leister.

The robotic welder’s speed, heat output and pressure should be properly programmed before the welding process begins. Photo: Leister.

Today’s most powerful hot-air welders for overlap welding of thermoplastic membranes are advertised to achieve speeds of up to 18 meters (59 feet) per minute. That’s fast enough to quickly ruin a roofing contractor’s day.

These robotic welders are digitally monitored to achieve consistent overlap welding performance, but they cannot adapt to changing environmental conditions automatically. It’s the contractor’s job to monitor and assess seam quality before the base seam is welded and when ambient temperatures or other factors potentially influence welding performance.

Successful hot-air welding requires the use of specialized, properly maintained and adjusted equipment operated by experienced personnel familiar with hot-air welding techniques. Achieving consistent welds is a function of ensuring that the roofing membrane surface is clean and prepared for heat welding, conducting test welds to determine proper equipment settings, and evaluating weld quality after welding has been completed.

Setting up hot-air robotic welders properly is the key to having a properly installed thermoplastic roof, and performing test welds is one of the most important steps. Making appropriate adjustments before the welding process begins ensures that the correct combination of welder speed, heat output and pressure is programmed into the robotic welder.

For most roofing professionals, these procedures have been firmly established in the minds of their crews and equipment operators through education and field training. But let’s not forget that Murphy’s Law often rules on both large and small low-slope roofing projects.

The frightening reality about using robotic welders is if they are set-up incorrectly or environmental conditions change, the applicator may weld thousands of feet of non-spec seam before anyone even bothers to check. If you probe for voids at the end of the day, it is probably too late.

If serious problems are discovered, the applicator must strip in a new weld via adhesive, cover tape, or heat welding, depending on what the membrane manufacturer will allow. If seams must be re-welded, the operator has to create not one, but two robotic welds on each side of the cover strip. The sheet will also need to be cleaned and re-conditioned no matter what method is used.

Can these errors be corrected? Absolutely. Except now the crew is in a real hurry because the roofer is working on his own time, and application errors tend to snowball under these conditions.

Reality Check

What goes on in the field is sometimes quite different than what one sees when hot-air welding thermoplastics under an expert’s supervision.To support this view, we asked four field service reps, each with a minimum of 35 years of roofing experience, to comment. The most senior “tech” has worked for six different thermoplastic membrane manufacturers in his career. Their names shall remain anonymous, but this writer will be happy to put readers in touch with them upon request.

Successful hand welding is a skill that is developed and refined over time. The correct selection of welder temperature and nozzle width can have a significant effect on the quality of the hand weld. Photo: GAF.

Successful hand welding is a skill that is developed and refined over time. The correct selection of welder temperature and nozzle width can have a significant effect on the quality of the hand weld. Photo: GAF.

So, let’s welcome Christian, Dave, Mark and Walter, and get straight to the point: Is the average roofing crew diligent enough when it comes to properly testing welds using industry best practices?

“I would say ‘probably not,” exclaims Walter. Dave just shakes his head as his colleague Mark adds, “I would have to say no.”

Considering the generally laudable performance of thermoplastic membranes over the last decade or so, we must interpret our experts’ opinions as suggesting the need for further improvement in hot-air welding techniques. Hence, the purpose of this article.

“There are a few outstanding issues causing bad welds,” says Walter. “These include welding over dirty or contaminated membranes; improper equipment setup; using crews with inadequate training; and knowing the difference between the weldability of various manufacturers’ membranes.”

Welding equipment consists of three main components: the power supply, the hot air welder (either automatic or hand-held), and the extension cord. A stable power supply of adequate wattage and consistent voltage is critical to obtaining consistent hot air welds and to prevent damage to the welder.

The use of a contractor-supplied portable generator is recommended, although house-supplied power may be acceptable. Relying on power sources that are used for other equipment that cycle on and off is not recommended. Power surges and/or disruptions and insufficient power may also impact welding quality. Proper maintenance of welding equipment is also of obvious importance.

“Contractors seem to never have enough power on the roof,” observes Mark. “The more consistent your power is, the more consistent your welds will be. Too many times, I’ve seen too many tools (hand guns, auto welder, screw guns and a RhinoBond machine) plugged into one generator.”

Generator-induced challenges on the jobsite are going to arise, agrees Christian. “But at least today there is more experience in understanding, dealing with, and ultimately preventing these issues,” he says.

Most TPO and PVC membrane suppliers also recommend using the latest automatic welding equipment, which provides improved control of speed, temperature and pressure. Our four experts generally agree that field welding performance has improved over the years and programmable robotic welders have helped. They also point to proper training and experience as crucial factors.

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Published at Fri, 28 Jul 2017 19:02:50 +0000


Planning and Teamwork Are Essential in Tackling Retail Project


Planning and Teamwork Are Essential in Tackling Retail Project

Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system over the existing modified bitumen roof system on two buildings totaling approximately 75,400 square feet.

Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system over the existing modified bitumen roof system on two buildings totaling approximately 75,400 square feet.

Headquartered in Atlanta, Peach State Roofing Inc. has 15 branches and covers clients across the nation. The company specializes in commercial and industrial roofing, and excels at large-scale single-ply jobs. The goal of every branch is to provide the same level of service for clients no matter where they are in the country, as exemplified by a recent project at a large retail mall in South Carolina.

Peach State’s Charlotte branch is located in Rock Hill, S.C. The company has re-roofed three of the five roofs at Gaffney Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C., including two roofs completed this year in just two weeks. Anthony Wilkerson, the branch manager, and Blake Wideman, strategic accounts, shared their insights on the project.

Peach State’s Charlotte branch focuses primarily on re-roofing, service and maintenance work for existing customers and property managers. Most of the company’s work involves TPO, EPDM and PVC, but crews have to be able to handle almost every type of system on the market. “If there is a hotel with some shingles or metal on it, we want to be able to complete every facet of the job, but most of our work revolves around single-ply roofing,” Wilkerson states. “We are certified with every major single-ply manufacturer.”

Anthony Wilkerson (left) and Blake Wideman of Peach State Roofing’s Charlotte branch inspect the completed project at Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C.

Anthony Wilkerson (left) and Blake Wideman of Peach State Roofing’s Charlotte branch inspect the completed project at Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C.

According to Wilkerson and Wideman, Peach State’s strength lies in building relationships with its clients by providing quality workmanship and excellent customer service. “We do that through our project management, our expertise and our training,” says Wilkerson. “We put a lot into training our employees so that they know how to do the technical details that the manufacturers are asking for.”

Wilkerson believes Peach State offers the best of both worlds—flexibility at each branch and the depth of knowledge from the large corporate organization. “We’re independent, but I work with the corporate office every day,” says Wilkerson. “We have local representation around the country, but at the same time we have that teamwork, so you’re still getting the same quality from each office that you’re getting from the corporate office. We try to be as close to the way Atlanta does things—the Peach State Way—all across board, all over the country.”

Landing a Big One

In the case of the recent project at Gaffney Premium Outlets, the work was an outgrowth of the company’s previous successful projects, including a re-roofing job at the same complex last year. “Our bid was what they were looking for,” Wideman says. “We gave them the price they were looking for and the quality they wanted. That’s how we were awarded this project.”

This aerial view shows the five buildings of the Gaffney Premium Outlets mall. Peach State Roofing re-roofed the two buildings on the left this year, after completing work on the building at the far right last year.

This aerial view shows the five buildings of the Gaffney Premium Outlets mall. Peach State Roofing re-roofed the two buildings on the left this year, after completing work on the building at the far right last year.

The mall is made up of five buildings, and the company re-roofed two this year totaling approximately 75,400 square feet. Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system from Firestone over the existing modified bitumen roof system. “We came up with a plan to cover the old roof with a half-inch high-density cover board,” Wilkerson says. “Then we mechanically attached a Firestone 60-mil white TPO system over the cover board.”

The system was chosen for its durability, according to Wilkerson. “They were looking for a long-term solution,” he says. “We went with a re-cover because it was more cost-effective for their budget, but we could still offer them the same warranty and the same guarantee that the system would be just as effective if they had torn the old system off and started from scratch.”

The company used 8-foot rolls of TPO on the project for several reasons. “We went with 8-foot rolls on this project because it was easier to apply the rolls,” notes Wilkerson. “They are not as heavy as the 10-foot rolls. It’s easier to let the rolls relax when you roll them out and easier to keep them tight when you are securing them to the deck.”

Fasteners were installed every 12 inches on center at the edge of the TPO sheets, and the next sheet was heat welded over the top of the screws and plates, and then mechanically fastened at the other end.
Extra care had to be taken with the details, especially walls and curbs. “We tore all of the old membrane off the curbs and off the walls, and we used bonding adhesive to go up the walls,” Wilkerson explains.

At the walls, the field sheets were run up the wall 12 inches and mechanically attached. “We adhere a sheet to the wall, and we heat weld that to the field sheet,” explains Wilkerson, “At the top of that, we use a water cutoff behind the sheet, and we use a termination bar. The termination bar is installed 12 inches on center, and then we use a sealant at the top of the termination bar. We came back with a surface-mount counterflashing, which basically just goes over the top of the termination bar. It has a little kick-out on it, so once that’s attached, it gives you double protection where your membrane is terminated.”

Curbs were handled in a similar fashion. “With the curbs, you run the field sheet right up to the curb, and then you mechanically attach it 12 inches on center,” Wilkerson notes. “Then we use bonding adhesive to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. We don’t do one piece and wrap it all the way around. We use four separate pieces, and we adhere them to the curb. Then we heat weld those pieces to the field sheet. For the curbs, we use a flashing that goes underneath the curb itself, and we attach that 12 inches on center all the way around. That lets the water shed over the HVAC unit and then down onto the membrane past the flashing, so there’s nowhere for the water to penetrate.”

Meeting the Challenges

The sheer size of the project was a challenge, but Peach State is used to handling large-scale projects. Logistics and scheduling were also demanding due to customer activity at the mall. “It was a good project for us, but I’d say one of the biggest challenges was that the mall remained open the whole time we were doing the roof,” Wilkerson says. “We had to check in with each tenant in every building to make sure everything was OK from the night before.”

Extra care had to be taken with the details at walls and curbs. Bonding adhesive was used to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. Then those pieces were heat welded to the field sheet.

Extra care had to be taken with the details at walls and curbs. Bonding adhesive was used to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. Then those pieces were heat welded to the field sheet.

The project called for roofing specific sections each day to make sure the roof stayed watertight at all times. “We sealed the roof up every night 100 percent, so if it rained in the evening, it had to be like we had never been up there,” Wilkerson recalls. “If we took three air conditioners apart in a section that we did one day, at night before those guys went home the air conditioners were wrapped back up, the flashing was put back around the air conditioner and all of the edges of the roof were sealed to the old roof so everything was watertight.”

Safety was also a concern, especially with pedestrian traffic below. “We had to make sure all of our safety procedures were in place for our crews and for the members of the public going in and out of the doors,” Wilkerson says.

The crews used safety lines at the perimeter, and anyone outside the safety lines had to be tied off at all times. “We had to make sure we had a man strictly watching out for the safety of the crews. You have to make sure any little pieces of membrane don’t blow off the roof. You have to make sure all of that is being cleaned up steadily as the job is going on. You don’t want the public to see anything except the flag stands on the roof.”

Staging was complicated, but luckily the jobsite offered ample space for trucks and cranes to be moved between the buildings. The key was to tackle high-traffic areas early in the morning and move to less busy spots as the day wore on.

Proper staging is crucial to jobsite efficiency, notes Wilkerson. “We like to stage the material as we put it on so we’re not dragging it across the roof,” he says. “It’s all right there for them, laid out as they go.”

Support and teamwork are essential up and down the line. “We work really well as a team, so if anyone has any small questions, they can ask the superintendent and call me, so we can make sure we take care of it the Peach State Way.”

Flexing Their Muscles

The project went off without a hitch, says Wilkerson. The mall traffic was never disrupted. “Not one leak, not one complaint on this project,” he says. “Our project management on this project was spot on. Our superintendents held their own out there. And our guys—it’s the attention to quality and all the time we put into training our guys that allows them to do this and make it look almost seamless. It’s one of those situations where you want it to look easy while you’re doing it, but when you’re in the mix of it and you’re trying to get it all done, it’s not as easy as it looks.”

Customer service was crucial. It wasn’t just the property management company that had to be kept informed—it was each individual retailer in the building. “There were so many people to deal with,” notes Wideman. “Every manager of each of those units had to be kept informed of the process. Roofing is not as hard as people think, but keeping up with the owners, keeping people happy, letting people know ahead of time what’s going on is a big challenge. We had to make friends with everyone ahead of time and let them know where to call with any questions.”

“The project, as far as roofing goes, was pretty straightforward,” concludes Wilkerson. “The key is to keep up with everyone on a daily basis and let them know what’s going on so if there is a small problem, it doesn’t keep brewing until it’s a big problem.”

Photos: Peach State Roofing Inc.

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Published at Thu, 27 Jul 2017 13:00:09 +0000


Definition of Resilience: Hospital Provides a Lesson in Preparing for Weather Events


Definition of Resilience: Hospital Provides a Lesson in Preparing for Weather Events

Staten Island University Hospital escaped major damage during Hurricane Sandy. The city of New York allocated $28 million to fund the hospital’s resiliency plan, and the state contributed an additional $12 million.

Staten Island University Hospital escaped major damage during Hurricane Sandy. The city of New York allocated $28 million to fund the hospital’s resiliency plan, and the state contributed an additional $12 million.

Almost five years ago, Hurricane Sandy bore down on New York City with winds that reached gusts of 100 miles an hour and a storm surge 16 feet above normal that flooded huge parts of the city. Entire neighborhoods lost electricity for several days, the Stock Exchange closed during and immediately after the storm, and scuba divers were called in to assess damage in parts of the city’s submerged subway system.

Staten Island, one of New York’s five boroughs, was heavily damaged. Its position in New York Harbor, at the intersection of the coastlines of Long Island and New Jersey, leaves the island particularly exposed to storm surge during extreme weather events. A geologist from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts described Staten Island as being, “at the end of, basically, a big funnel between New Jersey and New York.”

Staten Island University Hospital almost miraculously escaped major damage, despite flood waters coming within inches of it doors. The hospital stayed open during and after Hurricane Sandy, continuing to provide vital services despite the storm. The hospital is home to the largest emergency room on Staten Island, and houses more than one third of the borough’s in-patient beds. New York Mayor DeBlasio has called the hospital, “a truly decisive healthcare facility—even more so in times of crisis.”

While both hospital and city officials were relieved that the facility had escaped Sandy largely unharmed, the lesson that Sandy delivered was taken to heart: major mitigation efforts were needed if the hospital expected to survive similar storms in the future. With this in mind, the city of New York allocated $28 million to fund the hospital’s resiliency plan, with the state kicking in an additional $12 million.

The money is being spent on three major projects to better prepare the hospital for future storms: the elevation of critical building power and mechanical systems, the installation of sanitary holding tanks and backflow prevention, and the installation of major wind resiliency and roofing improvements. 

Resilient Design

The Staten Island experience, and the plan to upgrade its ability to withstand major weather events, is hardly unique. Nationwide, resilient design has become a major focus of the construction community.

Hurricane Sandy certainly intensified the sense of urgency surrounding the need for resilience. But well before that, Hurricane Katrina, in 2005, provided a tragic case study on the fragility of seemingly stable structures, as the storm brought a small, poor southern city to the brink of chaos and devastated entire neighborhoods. While these two hurricanes drew national and international attention, communities throughout the country have also been dealing with frequent, erratic and intense weather events that disrupted daily life, resulting in economic losses and, all too often, the loss of human life. These emergencies may include catastrophic natural disasters, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, sinkholes, fires, floods, tornadoes, hailstorms, and volcanic activity. They also refer to man-made events such as acts of terrorism, release of radioactive materials or other toxic waste, wildfires and hazardous material spills.

The focus, to a certain degree, is on upgrading structures that have been damaged in natural disasters. But even more, architects and building owners are focusing on building resilience into the fabric of a structure to mitigate the impact of future devastating weather events. And, as with the Staten Island Hospital, the roof is getting new attention as an important component of a truly resilient structure.

The resilience of the roofing system is a critical component in helping a building withstand a storm and rebound quickly. In addition, a robust roofing system can help maintain a habitable temperature in a building in case of loss of power. Photo: Hutchinson Design Group.

The resilience of the roofing system is a critical component in helping a building withstand a storm and rebound quickly. In addition, a robust roofing system can help maintain a habitable temperature in a building in case of loss of power. Photo: Hutchinson Design Group.

So, what is resilience, how is it defined, and why is it important to buildings in differing climates facing unique weather events? The Department of Homeland Security defines resilience as “the ability to adapt to changing conditions and withstand and rapidly recover from disruption due to emergencies.” The key words here are “adapt” and “rapidly recover.” In other words, resilience is measured in a structure’s ability to quickly return to normal after a damaging event. And the resilience of the roofing system, an essential element in protecting the integrity of a building, is a critical component in rebounding quickly. In addition, a robust roofing system can provide a critical evacuation path in an emergency, and can help maintain a habitable temperature in a building in case of loss of power.

According to a Resilience Task Force convened by the EPDM Roofing Association (ERA), two factors determine the resiliency of a roofing system: durable components and a robust design. Durable components are characterized by:
Outstanding weathering characteristics in all climates (UV resistance, and the ability to withstand extreme heat and cold).

  • Ease of maintenance and repair.
  • Excellent impact resistance.
  • Ability to withstand moderate movement cycles without fatigue.
  • Good fire resistance (low combustibility) and basic chemical resistance.
  • A robust design that will enhance the resiliency of a roofing system should incorporate:

  • Redundancy in the form of a backup system and/or waterproofing layer.
  • The ability to resist extreme weather events, climate change or change in building use.
  • Excellent wind uplift resistance, but most importantly multiple cycling to the limits of its adhesion.
  • Easily repaired with common tools and readily accessible materials.
  • More Information on Resilient Roofing

    The Resilience Task Force, working with the ERA staff, is also responding to the heightened interest in and concern over the resilience of the built environment by launching EpdmTheResilientRoof.org. The new website adds context to the information about EPDM products by providing a clearinghouse of sources about resilience, as well as an up-to-date roster of recent articles, blog posts, statements of professional organizations and other pertinent information about resilience.

    “This new website takes our commitment to the construction industry and to our customers to a new level. Our mission is to provide up-to-date science-based information about our products. Resilience is an emerging need, and we want to be the go-to source for architects, specifiers, building owners and contractors who want to ensure that their construction can withstand extreme events,” said Mike DuCharme, Chairman of ERA.

    EPDM roofs can be easily repaired and restored without the use of sophisticated, complicated equipment. Photo: Hutchinson Design Group.

    EPDM roofs can be easily repaired and restored without the use of sophisticated, complicated equipment. Photo: Hutchinson Design Group.

    EPDM and Resiliency

    The Resilience Task Force also conducted extensive fact finding to itemize the specific attributes of EPDM membrane that make it a uniquely valuable component of a resilient of a roofing system:

  • EPDM is a thermoset material with an inherit ability to recover and return to its original shape and performance after a severe weather event.
  • EPDM has been used in numerous projects in various geographic areas from the hottest climate in the Middle East to the freezing temperatures in Antarctica and Siberia.
  • After decades of exposures to extreme environmental conditions, EPDM membrane continues to exhibit a great ability to retain the physical properties and performances of ASTM specification standards.
  • EPDM is the only commercially available membrane that performs in an unreinforced state, making it very forgiving to large amounts of movement without damage and potentially more cycles before fatiguing.
  • EPDM offers excellent impact resistance to hail, particularly when aged.
  • EPDM is resistant to extreme UV exposure and heat.
  • EPDM far exceeded the test protocol ASTM D573 which requires materials to pass four weeks at 240 degrees Fahrenheit. EPDM black or white membranes passed 68 weeks at these high temperatures.
  • Exposed EPDM roof systems have been in service now for 50-plus years with little or no surface degradation.
  • EPDM is versatile.
  • EPDM can be configured in many roofing assemblies, including below-grade and between-slab applications.
  • EPDM is compatible with a broad range of construction materials/interfaces/conditions, making it a good choice for areas that may encounter unique challenges.
  • EPDM can be exposed to moisture and intense sunlight or totally immersed in salty water.
  • EPDM can easily be installed, repaired and restored following simple procedures without the use of sophisticated, complicated equipment.
  • EPDM can be repaired during power outages.
  • For further information about the need for resilience, and the appropriate use of EPDM in resilient structures, visit EPDMTheResilientRoof.com.

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    Published at Thu, 27 Jul 2017 14:00:21 +0000