Soprema to Host Building Envelope Clinic in New York


Soprema to Host Building Envelope Clinic in New York

Soprema Inc. will be hosting a regional Building Envelope Clinic in New York on Oct. 10, 2017, for architects, consultants and contractors looking to further their knowledge, network and earn continuing education units. The clinic will be held at AIA New York, located at 536 LaGuardia Pl., New York, NY 10012.

The Building Envelope Clinic will begin at 9:00 a.m. and conclude at 3:30 p.m. with a cocktail reception and prize raffle.

“We’re proud to be offering these clinics regionally to help support our consultants, contractors and architects,” said Sara Jonas of Soprema. “These courses continue to bring education to the forefront for our current partners, as well as those new to Soprema, while helping them to achieve credits to keep their accreditations.”

Courses offered during the Building Envelope Clinic include:

  • SBS-Modified Bitumen Technology –AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Wall Systems & Design – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Below Grade Waterproofing Systems & Design – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Vegetated Roofing Systems – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • PMMA/PMA Liquid Applied Membranes
  • For more information and to RSVP, click here.

    Published at Fri, 29 Sep 2017 14:00:29 +0000


    Congrats to Martin Stout on Winning the G.A.P Roofing Underlayment Quiz


    Congrats to Martin Stout on Winning the G.A.P Roofing Underlayment Quiz

    Martin knew that nearly 90 percent of the roofs in the U.S. have felt underlayment.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    Whenever we have someone win a prize through a contest on RoofersCoffeeShop.com we like to reach out to the winner and get to know them a little better. We were thrilled that the first winner randomly drawn from all of the correct responses to the G.A.P. Roofing Quiz was one of our RCS Influencers, Martin Stout.

    Martin is the President of Go Roof Tune Up, Inc., a California-based company that provides residential repair and reroofing in seven western U.S. states. Here is the question and the answer that he provided:

    Question: Out of the 133,600,000 roofs in the U.S. how many have felt underlayment?

    Answer: 124,335,964…nearly 90% of all the residential roofs in the US!  Saturated Organic Felt is still working after nearly 100 years, even though newer, non-breathable synthetics are trying to take over.  Felt has worked for years and still works today!  Additionally, some of the toughest roofing standards in the U.S., California Building codes, Miami-Dade codes and even the latest Western Roofing Contractors Association recent studies still proves that two layers of felt are the preferred roofing underlayment!

    We asked Martin how he knew that answer and his sense of humor was on point as he said, “I counted them.” We’re sure that Google probably played a role in forming that answer too!

    You can tell just by reading his answer that he is a fan of felt underlayment. When asked about them he replied, “I think it is a great underlayment. Everyone is trying to come up with this new, crazy synthetic stuff but I don’t see in the foreseeable future that they will ever be able to replace felt.”

    Martin has been a part of the RCS community for many years and says he thinks that it is a great resource. “I don’t do a lot of talking on there but I like to read things and see what other people are doing. It’s a great resource for networking, it’s entertaining, it’s helpful to me in running my business and Vickie [the Boss] is just really sweet.”

    Learn more about G.A.P. Roofing and felt underlayments.

    Published at Fri, 29 Sep 2017 16:43:09 +0000


    SHOWA 4561 Glove


    SHOWA 4561 Glove

    SHOWA unveiled its newest innovation, the SHOWA 4561 glove, at the National Safety Council Congress and Expo in Indianapolis, Ind. Sept. 25 – 27.
     
    The new SHOWA® 4561 is made in the USA and boasts cut-resistant 15 gauge Kevlar® construction. This allows the glove to be lightweight and stronger than other offerings. The 4561 is the only one of its kind which holds an ANSI A4 Cut Level, other gloves on the market only reach ANSI A3. The A4 rating means that the 4561 will stand up to higher cut forces. 

    Aside from the new ANSI A4 ranking, the SHOWA® 4561 utilizes SHOWA’s patented Zorb-IT® grip technology, which allows users to maintain a stronger grip in oily and wet conditions without sacrificing safety. The top of the glove showcases a new informational design that indicates the glove size, the Zorb-IT® technology, genuine Kevlar® logo, and the glove’s certifications. To maximize dexterity, the SHOWA® 4561 is creatively engineered with next generation seamless fit technology which allows for perfect comfort along the fingers and palm.

    For more information, visit 4561.showagroup.com

    Published at Fri, 29 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


    Kemper System Features Cost-Effective ‘Cool Roof’ Solutions


    Kemper System Features Cost-Effective ‘Cool Roof’ Solutions

    Kemper System America Inc. now offers two cost-effective ‘cool roof’ solutions for prolonging the life of metal, BUR, modified bitumen and aged single-ply roof systems.

    Roof Guardian RG-170 is an elastomer-based coating system ideal for extending the life of many types of roofing assemblies. Formulated using a 100 percent acrylic polymer base for enhanced adhesion and durability, the coating features a high Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) rating of 109 and is Class A fire rated. Roof Guardian RG-180 is a fiber-reinforced elastomeric coating with an acrylic polymer base, ideal for metal, concrete, single ply, modified bitumen, and granular cap sheets. It offers an SRI rating of 108.

    “Kemper System has been at the vanguard of liquid-applied roof waterproofing solutions for decades. These two new white Roof Guardian coating systems offer a quick and cost-effective approach for transforming many kinds of existing low-slope roofs into a cool roof that can help building owners cut cooling costs,” says Jim Arnold, Director of Product Development for Kemper System.

    Part of the company’s Roof Guardian Technologies line, the roof coatings can be quickly applied with a commercial-grade sprayer or roller. The highly reflective bright white finish lowers the surface temperature of the substrate to reduce thermal transfer into the structure. This high solar reflectance helps lower indoor temperatures to reduce building cooling requirements.

    Formulated to resist cracking and peeling, both products provide excellent waterproofing and long-term mildew resistance. Both solutions are Energy Star and Cool Roof rated.

    “For more than 60 years, Kemper System has been a global industry leader in cold liquid- applied, reinforced roofing and waterproofing, having invented the technology and holding the first patents,” says Arnold. “Today the company offers a full range of building envelope solutions to protect against weather, preserve the integrity of surfaces, and enhance the comfort and value of buildings.”

    This portfolio encompasses Wall Guardian fibered acrylic air barrier, Roof Guardian Technologies elastomer-based roof coatings, and HeatBloc-ULTRA radiant heat barrier. Other high-value brands include COLEAN traffic coating systems, and the company flagship for exterior and interior waterproofing, Kemperol reinforced membrane systems.

    LEARN MORE

    Visit: Kempersystem.net
    Call: (800) 541-5455
    Email: inquiry@kempersystem.net

    Published at Fri, 29 Sep 2017 13:00:26 +0000


    Kemper System Features Cost-Effective ‘Cool Roof’ Solutions


    Kemper System Features Cost-Effective ‘Cool Roof’ Solutions

    Kemper System America Inc. now offers two cost-effective ‘cool roof’ solutions for prolonging the life of metal, BUR, modified bitumen and aged single-ply roof systems.

    Roof Guardian RG-170 is an elastomer-based coating system ideal for extending the life of many types of roofing assemblies. Formulated using a 100 percent acrylic polymer base for enhanced adhesion and durability, the coating features a high Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) rating of 109 and is Class A fire rated. Roof Guardian RG-180 is a fiber-reinforced elastomeric coating with an acrylic polymer base, ideal for metal, concrete, single ply, modified bitumen, and granular cap sheets. It offers an SRI rating of 108.

    “Kemper System has been at the vanguard of liquid-applied roof waterproofing solutions for decades. These two new white Roof Guardian coating systems offer a quick and cost-effective approach for transforming many kinds of existing low-slope roofs into a cool roof that can help building owners cut cooling costs,” says Jim Arnold, Director of Product Development for Kemper System.

    Part of the company’s Roof Guardian Technologies line, the roof coatings can be quickly applied with a commercial-grade sprayer or roller. The highly reflective bright white finish lowers the surface temperature of the substrate to reduce thermal transfer into the structure. This high solar reflectance helps lower indoor temperatures to reduce building cooling requirements.

    Formulated to resist cracking and peeling, both products provide excellent waterproofing and long-term mildew resistance. Both solutions are Energy Star and Cool Roof rated.

    “For more than 60 years, Kemper System has been a global industry leader in cold liquid- applied, reinforced roofing and waterproofing, having invented the technology and holding the first patents,” says Arnold. “Today the company offers a full range of building envelope solutions to protect against weather, preserve the integrity of surfaces, and enhance the comfort and value of buildings.”

    This portfolio encompasses Wall Guardian fibered acrylic air barrier, Roof Guardian Technologies elastomer-based roof coatings, and HeatBloc-ULTRA radiant heat barrier. Other high-value brands include COLEAN traffic coating systems, and the company flagship for exterior and interior waterproofing, Kemperol reinforced membrane systems.

    LEARN MORE

    Visit: Kempersystem.net
    Call: (800) 541-5455
    Email: inquiry@kempersystem.net

    Published at Fri, 29 Sep 2017 13:00:26 +0000


    The Right Hand Tool for the Right Job


    The Right Hand Tool for the Right Job

    Technology and automation is great but sometime so is a good, old-fashioned hand tool.

    By Heidi J. Ellsworth.

    We all know how important having the proper tools is to complete a quality job quickly.  In today’s world, too often we are looking at technology to provide the needed tools.  But it is important to remember that it is a balance between the world of technology and old-world craftsmanship.

    In roofing, it is still about the craft.  We are an industry of men and women who take immense pride in a job well done.  Standing back and looking at a new roof, well, it is a thing of beauty.  At the Coffee Shop, we are incredibly proud of our roofers and the industry that makes beautiful new roofs possible.

    We also enjoy sharing some of the more interesting parts of this industry.  One such company that we would like to spotlight is Wil-Mar Products.  It was founded by a roofing contractor, W. R. “Bill” Merrin in 1990.  He saw a need in the industry to seal the vent pipe to a roof flashing and eliminate mastic and taping. His first product, The Pipe Collar, was invented and patented.

    Today Wil-Mar Products is led by Bill’s wife, Marianne Sumter and they have been a loyal advertiser with RCS for years.  We would like to highlight another invention from Wil-Mar, The Roofers’ Saw, that was co-designed by Bill and Michael Steele.

    This saw is used for removing broken shakes, shingles and slate. It cuts off the fasteners quickly without damage to adjacent material.  It is the perfect tool to keep in your tool belt to cut nails and staples fast with a pull stroke and it is self-feeding.  With this beauty in your tool belt you can increase productivity on repairs and re-roofing, saving you and your crew time and money.

    The hand saw consists of a 25″ wood handle and a 27″ removable and replaceable saw blade.  It is a simple tool that makes the job easier.  Isn’t that what it is all about.  At the Coffee Shop, we love bringing you these cool tools.  Thank you Wil-Mar Products!

    Order your Roofer’s Saw today.

    About Wil-Mar Products, Inc.
    Wil-Mar Products, Inc. was established from a desire to offer sustainable products and roof solutions to meet the needs and demands of the roofing industry.  Wil-Mar Products, Inc. has over 25 years’ experience, providing products which enable the roofing contractor to provide quality roofs for new or re-roofed, residential and commercial buildings.  Dedicated to providing the utmost customer service for its customers, the company is committed to providing personalized service and quality products. For more information, visit www.wilmarproducts.com.

    Published at Fri, 29 Sep 2017 02:00:15 +0000


    The Legalization of Marijuana and Its Impact on the Construction Industry


    The Legalization of Marijuana and Its Impact on the Construction Industry

    NEWTON, Mass. — As laws change regarding marijuana use, they present a whole host of ongoing human resource issues, especially for the construction industry.  Attorney Trenton Cotney helps employers understand the complex issues surrounding the legalization of marijuana and its effects on the work place environment in his featured session, The Legalization of Marijuana and its Impact on the Construction Industry at METALCON, on Oct. 18-19 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

    Cotney of Trent Cotney, P.A. Construction Law Group specializes in roofing litigation and arbitration throughout the United States.  He will explore: What are the limitations of the use of marijuana? How do employers need to modify their human resource policies and manuals? How does the acceptance of medical marijuana cards relate to a drug-free workplace?  Cotney answers these questions and more while helping employers create policies and procedures to address the various concerns.

    “A recent surge of medical marijuana prescriptions and an increase in recreational usage has prompted a wealth of human resource issues,” said Cotney.  “I receive calls daily from employers.  For example, I’ll get a call from a roofing business looking to hire a skilled roofer who has a medical marijuana card, but the business is a declared drug-free workplace.  Does the business give him an exemption?”

    “Marijuana is still illegal on the Federal level, so federal law does not require employers to accommodate a person’s medical marijuana use,” said Cotney.  “However, a number of states have laws that may arguably be interpreted as requiring such an accommodation.   In any event, usage is widespread in the construction industry, and there is already a shortage of skilled labor.  It’s going to have a huge impact on the workforce.”

    “Testing isn’t where it needs to be; it is sub-par,” he said.  “An employee would have to challenge his employer if he wasn’t using marijuana at the time of testing, but he may have used a few days prior, over the weekend.  He will still test positive, failing the drug test, and if he causes injury, it creates a whole host of issues.  You either have to fire the person or run the risk of liability.  You are going to have tough decisions to make.”

    “The construction industry is extremely vulnerable to safety challenges with the legalization of marijuana,” said Cotney.  “Doing sheet metal work, roofing, operating heavy equipment―all present safety challenges for an individual with a medical marijuana card.”  

    “Employers need to add policy statements to their human resource manuals to continue to operate under this new environment,” he said.  “Ambiguity can create issues, including OSHA issues.  As society changes, the law has to catch up to it, like during the prohibition years.  There are state laws, federal laws and potential risks.  Employers want to know:  How do I quantify risk and eliminate it? How do I adjust and adapt to this new framework?”

    “Then, there is the issue of having a drug-free workplace environment,” said Cotney.  “Employers need to create specific policies to address it, requiring a separate section on marijuana, outlining testing, limitations of testing, random drug tests and implications.” 

    “Employers need to make policies more robust to deal with this new legislation,” he said.  “You have to prepare yourself.  For example, in Florida, if you maintain a drug-free workplace, you’ll receive a five percent discount on workers’ compensation.  Are you prepared to give up that discount?  It is a huge problem.”

    Cotney will cover: here’s what’s happening, here are the issues, here are the potential solutions and everything in between. 

    “Any time you have new legislation, you are going to have these issues,” said Cotney.  “You need to think about how to adapt and evolve; how to integrate and be forward thinking.  I am here to protect the employer and educate the employees. ” 

    For more information, visit www.roofinglawyer.com.

    Published at Thu, 28 Sep 2017 13:00:00 +0000


    Liberty University Taps Experienced Team for Indoor Practice Facility


    Liberty University Taps Experienced Team for Indoor Practice Facility

    Liberty University

    Photo: Leah Seavers. Copyright Liberty University

    While he was a student in the 1970s at Liberty Baptist College in Lynchburg, Va., Craig McCarty took a job with a roofing company to help him pay his way through school. One of his business courses required students to set up a model business, so McCarty set up a fictional roofing company.

    When a recession forced his boss to close down the company where he worked, McCarty turned his classroom project into reality. He got his contractor’s license and formed his own roofing business at the age of 20. More than 40 years later, he is installing roofs on the same campus he once took classes for a college now known as Liberty University.

    McCarty is the president of McCarty Roofing, headquartered in Lynchburg, Va. This year the company installed the standing seam metal roof on Liberty University’s new indoor football practice facility, the fourth building the company has worked on at the school. McCarty has always been fascinated by metal roofs, and he estimates that 70 percent of the company’s business comes from the metal segment of the market. “It’s our passion, and we’re really good at it,” he says.

    Liberty University’s new indoor practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field.

    Liberty University’s new indoor practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field. The structural metal roof system is made of panels that run the entire width of the building.

    He’s found a great place to ply his trade in Liberty University, which has made roofs manufactured by Fabral Metal Wall and Roof Systems into something of a signature architectural style. Other Fabral roofs at the university include those on Williams Stadium, Hancock Welcome Center, Jerry Falwell Library, and the LaHaye Recreation and Fitness Center.

    According to Jerry Wandel, Fabral’s Mid-Atlantic territory manager, based in Richmond, Va., Fabral and distributor NB Handy in Lynchburg have partnered to provide architectural metal enclosure systems for 13 buildings on the campus since 2010.

    The new practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field, and the design for the structural metal system on the vaulted barrel roof called for panels—many as long as 240 feet—that would run the entire width of the building.

    Fabral’s Stand’N Seam 24-gauge panels in Dark Bronze were specified for the project. According to Wandel, the product features a unique stainless-steel clip design and double lock-seamed side joints that allow panels to expand and contract throughout their entire length. The system had been installed successfully on indoor practice facilities at other colleges, including Georgia Tech, the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech and Virginia Military Institute.

    “When you run a panel that long, clearly one of the biggest concerns is expansion and contraction,” Wandel says. “Our Stand’N Seam product just lends itself to a project that has 240-foot panels. This one was right in our wheelhouse.”

    Riding the Curve

    The first task for McCarty Roofing was drying in the metal deck. Crews installed two layers of 2 ½ inch polysio and covered the insulation with Blueskin, a self-adhering underlayment manufactured by Henry.

    The metal panels were fabricated on the site. Fabral supplied the roll former and brought in Ray Berryhill to operate the equipment. “Ray has done all of these jobs for us,” notes Wandel. “We want to make sure the contractor is in position to have a quality installation. Ray has so much knowledge about these jobs. He was the perfect person to execute this one.”

    The panels were fabricated on the site.

    The panels were fabricated on the site. The roll former was lifted into place at the edge of the roof by crane, and panels were rolled directly onto the roof and stacked for installation.

    A crane was used to lift the roll former into place at the edge of the roof. “We were able to set the front two feet of the roll former in the built-in steel gutter, and then drop the back end of the machine down to the proper angle so we could roll the panels right onto the roof,” McCarty explains. “About every 15 or 20 feet up the roof we would stack some insulation, so the panel would float across the roof. Once it hit the top and went down the other side, it could just ride the roof down.”

    The original plan was to install the panels as they came off the roll former, but McCarty decided it would be more efficient to run all of the panels, stack them on the roof, and install them once all of the panels were fabricated. “We had a large crane on site that was costing us money, and we had the people from Fabral there,” he recalls. “I went to the construction manager and said, ‘It’s going to make a lot more sense if we get all of the panels for the project up on the roof as quickly as possible.’”

    The 4,000-pound metal coils typically supplied enough material for 8-10 panels, so Berryhill would run 8-10 panels at a time as crews from McCarty Roofing stacked them. When the roll former was lowered to the ground to load another coil, workers would strap the panels into place, figure out how much area the panels would cover, and set up again another 20 feet or so down the roof to receive the next batch. “We had a series of 15 or 20 straps for each bundle of panels,” says McCarty. “We had to be careful, but with eight people, you could pick up the panel and gently set it down.”

    After the roll forming crew was done, the panels were pulled off of the stacks and installed. “It was a pretty extreme radius, but the panels just laid down on the roof perfectly,” McCarty recalls. “The design worked out really well.”

    Liberty University

    Photo: Joel Coleman. Copyright Liberty University

    The built-in gutter gave crews a good location to set the bottom edge of the panels. “At the eaves, the roof pitch was very steep—maybe 12:12—and it was almost flat at the top,” notes McCarty. “We had to be tied off 100 percent of the time. We used retractables, but the safety equipment still limited our movement. It was pretty difficult for the guys working the first 30 or 40 feet.”

    The roof featured large skylights, which made the metal panel layout critical. The design also featured upper and lower sections that stepped down around large windows, which made for some tricky details. “At the gable ends, we had to make the cuts at an angle,” McCarty notes. “We cut the panels in place with drill shears and hand turned them with tongs to lock then onto a cleat.”

    The schedule was tight, and weather was also a concern. “It was in the dead of winter,” McCarty recalls. “We started laying panels in January. Fortunately, we had a mild winter, but at times it was like a wind tunnel. You’re not going to pick up a 240-foot panel in 35 mile-an-hour winds, so there were days we just weren’t able to work.”

    The project was wrapped up at the end of May, and McCarty credits the decision to stack the panels as one of the keys to meeting the deadline. “It was the right call,” he says. “The time we saved made up for the lost days due to the weather and helped us complete the job on time.”

    TEAM

    Architect: VMDO Architects, Charlottesville, Va., VMDO.com
    Construction Manager: CMA Inc., Lynchburg, Va., CMAinc.us
    Roofing Contractor: McCarty Roofing Inc., Lynchburg, Va., McCartyroofing.net
    Distributor: NB Handy Co., Lynchburg, Va., NBhandy.com
    Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Fabral Metal Wall and Roof Systems, Fabral.com

    Published at Thu, 28 Sep 2017 20:10:27 +0000


    How to safely inspect your roof after a storm


    How to safely inspect your roof after a storm

    This hurricane season has been historic in its intensity and damage. But it’s not just homes in the storm tracks that may need a roofer’s attention. Punishing winds and debris have been taking their toll on roofs all along the Eastern Seaboard and Gulf Coast. Home and property owners should be arranging for post-storm inspections now, so roofing contractors like you can provide any necessary repairs before the challenges of winter set in.

    Here are a few tips to share with your customers as they assess any hurricane season-related damage.

    Inside: Begin in the attic, if it’s accessible, during the daytime.

    • The first and surest sign of a problem would be sunlight showing through the plywood decking, which may indicate serious holes in need of repair.
    • If there are no obvious holes, use a flashlight to inspect the decking for dark stains or streaks, as well as sagging, all of which could be caused by moisture.

    Outside: You may be able to see most, if not all, of your roof from ground level. Walk around your house, examining the roof for these signs of damage:

    • Missing shingles should be replaced as quickly as possible.
    • Cracked or curled shingles are sometimes caused by high winds or flying debris.
    • Dark patches where the granules have come off of the shingle. In addition to affecting the overall look of the roof, bare patches like these leave the shingles vulnerable to the sun, which can, over time, dry out the asphalt, and may lead to leaks.
    • Bent or detached flashing. Flashing helps keep water from chimneys, vents, and other roof penetrations and should be thoroughly sealed to prevent water intrusion.
    • Debris. A branch on the roof may not seem like a big deal, but over time, it can rub the granules loose from your shingles, or may even be covering a crack that it caused as it landed.

    Up the ladder: If you are comfortable climbing a ladder and the weather conditions allow you to do so safely, you can get a better look at your roof up close. Look for:

    • Loose nails or nail heads raised above the shingle surface may be just one storm away from letting go entirely.
    • Gutter debris can contribute to ice dams later in the year. Your roofing contractor may provide gutter cleaning services if you are not comfortable doing the job yourself.
    • Flashing on the upslope (or back) of the chimney and penetrations can be seen more easily from the roof itself.

    If you find damage: Call a local, reputable roofing contractor right away. After storms, you may receive solicitations from unfamiliar contractors looking for work.  To find reputable, factory-certified contractors in your area, visit the GAF contractor locator at: http://www.gaf.com/roofing/contractors.

    The sooner you address any hurricane-season damage, the more secure your roof will be for the winter months.

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    Published at Wed, 27 Sep 2017 18:49:19 +0000


    NRCA Mourns Passing of its Former President Donald McNamara


    NRCA Mourns Passing of its Former President Donald McNamara

    Don McNamaraNRCA is saddened by the passing of Donald McNamara on Sept. 16 at the age of 81.

    McNamara was the majority owner of F.J.A. Christiansen Roofing Co., Inc. (FJAC) from 1967 to 1995. After his retirement, he helped lead the formation of Tecta America Corp. and also served as its first CEO and on its board of directors.  McNamara served as NRCA president from 1986-87.

    “Don had a strong dedication to the roofing industry. It was so strong, it led him out of retirement to help build one of the largest roofing companies in the country,” says Reid Ribble, CEO of the National Roofing Contractors Association. “He was a great leader who knew how to live life to the fullest.”

    In addition to serving as NRCA’s president, McNamara also chaired several committees during his NRCA tenure, including the Asbestos Committee; Nominating Committee; NRCA/IWA Labor Relations Committee; Audit, Budget and Finance Committee; and the Awards Committee.

    He also was the 1990 recipient of the J.A. Piper Award, NRCA’s highest honor.

    NRCA offers its condolences to his three sons, Timothy, Rob (former NRCA president) and Theodore, and his wife, Valerie.

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    Published at Wed, 27 Sep 2017 18:33:41 +0000


    What’s Happening in Metal Roofing at METALCON


    What’s Happening in Metal Roofing at METALCON

    NETWON, Mass. METALCON, the largest international event in the metal construction industry, announced program highlights for its metal roofing industry attendees.

    One of METALCON’s new featured presentations this year is the “Top 10 Things That Get Metal Roof Designers in Trouble” by Brian Gardiner of BMG Enterprises, LLC, and Charlie Smith of McElroy Metal. Together, they’ll address the most common mistakes made in designing and specifying a metal roof system and proper steps to avoid them. Drawing from their 50+ years of combined metal roofing experience, Gardiner and Smith will detail how to design for differences in metal roofing system performance, provisions for metal expansion and contraction, and the keys to successful metal roof flashing design. In addition, they will explain how to select the correct design options and the importance of product testing.

    Also new this year, is “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly of Mechanically Seamed Roof Panels” by Jonathan Rider of D.I. Roof Seamers. This session will cover everything attendees need to know about metal roof installation: tips and techniques for installing roof panels, basic operations of a roof seamer, correct hand crimping practices and basic troubleshooting.  Rider will use real-world scenarios dealing with modulation problems, surface contaminates and other issues faced on the job site.  Finally, seam appearances will be addressed in detail to help attendees better understand what is happening inside the seam, and what it will look like after installation.  Both featured presentations take place on Oct. 18 and 19 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. 

    Also for metal roofing fans, the Metal Construction Association’s (MCA) Games Task Force is celebrating its fourth annual metal roofing competition with a number of different challenges known as Aces of Las Vegas.  Five teams of construction professionals compete for thousands of dollars in cash awards and the winning title on Oct. 18-20 at METALCON.  Each challenge takes 15 to 30 minutes to complete.  Fastest time and accuracy are the two key winning factors.  Judging the competition are members of the Metal Building Contractors and Erectors Association. 

    The Aces of Las Vegas competitions are as follows:

    1:00 p.m. Game 1:  The MBCI & Pac-Clad “Retrofit Panel Installation Challenge.”  Contestants install the “base” R-panel roofing onto the Games steel-framed mock-ups that are 8-foot x 9-foot.

    2:00 p.m., Game 2:  “Screw Gun Challenge,” sponsored by Triangle Fastener Corporation.  Contestants install a series of self-drilling fasteners into a structural zee-shaped purlin mounted on a steel framework platform. 

    3:00 p.m., Game 3: “Hug a Roof Challenge,” sponsored by Roof Hugger, LLC.  Contestants install 40 lineal feet of factory-notched, zee-shaped sub-purlins on a mock-up existing ribbed metal roof paneled frame. 

    4:00 p.m., Game 4: “Standing Seam Challenge,” sponsored by New Tech Machinery and Drexel Metals.  Contestant teams install six each, 16-inch wide metal roof panels over factory-notched sub-purlins.  

    5:00 p.m., Game 5: “Let It Snow Challenge,” sponsored by S-5! Contestants must properly install a mechanically attached snow retention system onto 16-inch metal roof panels.  

    Meanwhile, after its successful initial launch last year, top experts in the metal roofing industry will lead the MCA Metal Roof Installation Training― a two-day, eight-hour certification program based on MCA’s Metal Roof Installation Manual, which kicks off before the show on Tuesday, Oct. 17.

    In addition to streamlining and updating the certification program for 2017, further plans for this year include more training on: substrates, safety, sealants, flashings, panel types and connections, tools, fasteners, maintenance and more.  Again, participants will have the opportunity to experience quality face-time with industry experts, visit the exhibit hall throughout the duration of the show and access the full conference program.  The objective is to couple the training program with the exhibit floor where participants can see live demonstrations of what they have just learned, and network with industry experts. 

    Scott Kriner, MCA’s technical director and program presenter, explains how both participants and manufacturers benefit.  “Many metal roof manufacturers have their own in-house training programs for installers and contractors to become familiar with specific profiled panels, trim, clips and ancillaries,” said Kriner.  “This new Metal Roof Installation Training program gives manufacturers access to a pool of qualified individuals trained in key topics related to metal roof installation. Therefore, their installers and contractors will be prepared to hit the ground running with a basic knowledge gained through this certification program at METALCON. As a result, manufacturers will be able to create more efficient and tailored in-house training programs.”

    “For those outside the metal roofing industry, this certification program offers a great opportunity to learn about the industry and experience practical training in topics most roof installers are required to know,” said Kriner.

    For more information, visit www.metalcon.com

    Published at Wed, 27 Sep 2017 13:00:00 +0000


    Temporary Roof Membrane Offers Solution for Storm-Damaged Roofs


    Temporary Roof Membrane Offers Solution for Storm-Damaged Roofs

    FiberTite Roofing Systems introduces its new temporary roofing membrane, FiberTite Blue Roof. The FiberTite Blue Roof is a fabric-reinforced thermoplastic roof membrane designed for use on flat commercial and industrial roofs to offer a temporary solution for damaged roofs until permanent repairs can be made. The coating on the temporary roof membrane provides UV resistant performance for up to one year, as well as abrasion resistance. The fabric reinforcement provides both tear and puncture resistance. It is available in rolls that are 100 inches wide by 100 feet long. According to the manufacturer, it is ideal for temporary repair of damage caused by disastrous weather events, and it can also be used for tear-off areas or new construction until the final roof assembly can be installed.

    The temporary membrane can be made watertight by conventional commercial hot-air weld seaming equipment. Alternate temporary seaming and sealing methods may include the use of FiberTite FTR-101 General Purpose Sealant, waterproofing caulk sealants, or adhesive tapes including duct tape. FiberTite accessories, such as molded pipe seals and corners, flashing membrane and FiberTite FTR-101 Sealant, can be used to temporarily seal roof penetrations.

    Published at Wed, 27 Sep 2017 17:00:45 +0000


    Beacon 3D+


    Beacon 3D+

    Beacon 3D+ uses HOVER’s patented technology to make measuring a home and estimating a project incredibly easy and accurate by transforming smartphone photos into a fully measured and customizable 3D model. By taking just a few pictures of the exterior of a home, Beacon 3D+ will automatically generate the measurements required for a contractor to provide a precise estimate for roofing, siding and windows. Additionally, Beacon 3D+ creates an interactive 3D model of the home along with design features that contractors can use to effectively engage homeowners and speed up the sales cycle.

    Contractors that have used the Hover technology that is inside of Beacon 3D+ have seen these amazing benefits:

    Published at Wed, 27 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


    Customizable Roofing Holiday Cards


    Customizable Roofing Holiday Cards

    Cap off a great year and set yourself up for peak profits in the New Year by connecting with clients and working new leads using Ziti Cards’ exclusive line of customizable roofing Christmas cards. Holiday cards are an economical and effective way to maintain customer relations so that a company enjoys lasting success. Featuring festive roofing-themed artwork, each design is printed on top quality cardstock. Easy to order online, Ziti’s roofing Holiday cards offer many free upgrades allowing you to add your logo and a personal message or year-end offer. Choose your favorite ink color and font, and select envelopes with your return address printed on them at no additional charge. If you like steep savings, ask about the early order program, or request your free samples today. Ziti Cards guarantees a hassle-free experience offering friendly, reliable service.

    For more information, visit www.ziticards.com.

    Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 13:00:00 +0000


    Understanding and Installing Insulated Metal Panels


    Understanding and Installing Insulated Metal Panels

    IMP installation

    IMP installation typically occurs once the steel frame is in place. The more common vertical installation allows for faster close-in for interior trade work. Photos: Metl-Span

    Insulated metal panels, or IMPs, incorporate a composite design with foam insulation sandwiched between a metal face and liner. IMPs form an all-in-one-system, with a single component serving as the exterior rainscreen, air and moisture barrier, and thermal insulation. Panels can be installed vertically or horizontally, are ideal for all climates, and can be coated with a number of high-performance coating systems that offer minimal maintenance and dynamic aesthetic options.

    The Benefits of IMPs

    At the crux of the IMP system is thermal performance in the form of polyurethane insulation. Panel thicknesses generally range from 2 to 6 inches, with the widest panels often reserved for cold storage or food processing applications. IMPs provide roughly three times the insulation value of field-assembled glass fiber systems, and panel thickness and coating options can be tailored to meet most R-value requirements.

    IMPs offer a sealed interior panel face to create a continuous weather barrier, and the materials used are not conducive to water retention. Metal—typically galvanized steel, stainless steel or aluminum—coupled with closed-cell insulation creates an envelope solution impervious to vapor diffusion. Closed-cell insulation has a much denser and more compact structure than most other insulation materials creating an advantage in air and vapor barrier designs.

    Time, budget and design can all be looming expectations for any building project. A valuable characteristic of IMPs is their ability to keep you on time and on budget while providing design flexibility to meet even the toughest building codes. The unique single-source composition of insulated metal panels allows for a single team to accomplish quick and complete enclosure of the building so interior trades can begin. This expedites the timeline and streamlines the budget by eliminating the need for additional teams to complete the exterior envelope and insulation.

    Minimizing Moisture

    The seams function both as barrier and pressure-equalized joint, providing long-term protection that requires minimal maintenance. Multiple component systems often rely on the accurate and consistent placement of sealant and may also require periodic maintenance. In addition, with IMPS a vented horizontal joint is designed for pressure equalization, and, even in the presence of an imperfect air barrier, the pressure-equalized joinery maintains the system’s performance integrity. With multi component systems, imperfections can lead to moisture infiltration.

    The real damage occurs when water enters through a wall and into a building becoming entrapped—which leads to corrosion, mold, rot, or delaminating. Unlike IMPs, some multi-component wall systems include a variety of different assembly materials that may hold water, like glass fiber or paper-faced gypsum. When those materials get wet, they can retain water, which can result in mold and degradation.

    Installation

    Typically, IMP installation is handled by crews of 2-4 people. Very little equipment is needed other than standard construction tools including hand drills, band and circular saws, sealant guns, and other materials. The panels can be installed via the ground or from a lift, and materials can be staged on interior floors or on the ground level. Panel installation typically occurs once the steel frame is in place and prior to interior fit out. The more common vertical installation allows for faster close-in for interior trade work.

    Metl-Span CFR insulated metal standing seam roof panels

    Metl-Span CFR insulated metal standing seam roof panels combine durable interior and exterior faces with exceptional thermal performance. Photos: Metl-Span

    IMPs are often installed using concealed clips and fasteners that are attached to the structural supports (16 gauge minimum wall thickness tubes or stud framing). The panels are typically installed bottom to top and left to right, directly over the steel framing. No exterior gypsum or weather barriers are required, as these panels act as the building’s weather barriers.

    The product’s high strength-to-weight ratio allows for longer installation spans and reduced structural costs. The metal skins act as the flange of a beam, resisting bending stress, while the foam core acts as the web of the beam, resisting shear stress. This important aspect also contributes to a long product life cycle.

    Design Flexibility

    IMPs offer a unique combination of aesthetic design options, including mitered panel edges, and a vast array of profiles, textures and reveal configurations. Flat wall profiles are ideally suited for designers seeking a monolithic architectural façade without sacrificing performance elements. The beautiful, flush panels have become a mainstay in projects in a number of high-end architectural markets.

    The 35,000-square-foot AgroChem manufacturing facility in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

    The 35,000-square-foot AgroChem manufacturing facility in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., showcases vertically installed Metl-Span CF36 insulated metal panels. Photos: Metl-Span

    Striated or ribbed wall profiles are more common in commercial and industrial applications. The products offer bold vertical lines for a distinctive blend of modern and utilitarian design, while continuing flawless symmetry from facade to facade, or room to room on exposed interior faces. Ribbed panels also work in tandem with natural lighting to create impactful designs. Different textures, such as embossed or simulated stucco finish, add dimensional nuance and contrast to projects of all shapes and sizes.

    IMPs are offered in an unlimited palette of standard and custom colors to meet any aesthetic requirement, as well as energy-efficient solar reflectivity standards. Panels are typically painted with a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) coating with optional pearlescent and metallic effects, and can even simulate expensive wood grains and natural metals. PVDF finishes offer exceptional performance characteristics that can be tailored to meet most any project needs, including saltwater environments and extreme weather conditions.

    Roof Configurations

    For all the above reasons, IMPs have also become a popular building product for roofing applications. Insulated metal standing seam roof panels provide the desired aesthetic of traditional single-skin metal standing seem roofs with added thermal performance. Standing seam roof panels feature a raised lip at the panel joinery, which not only enhances overall weather resistance but provides the desired clean, sleek sightlines.

    IMP installation

    IMP installation typically occurs once the steel frame is in place. The more common vertical installation allows for faster close-in for interior trade work Photos: Metl-Span

    The systems typically feature field-seamed, concealed fasteners that are not exposed to the elements. Just like their wall panel counterparts, insulated metal standing seam roof panels are available in a variety of thicknesses and exterior finishes.

    Another popular insulated metal roof application showcases overlapping profile panels. The product’s overlapping, through-fastened joinery allows for quick installation in roof applications, resulting in reduced labor costs and faster close-in.

    Finally, insulated metal roof deck panel systems combine the standard steel deck, insulation, and substrate necessary for single-ply membranes or non-structural standing seam roof coverings. The multi-faceted advantages of this system include longer spans between supports, superior deflection resistance, and a working platform during installation.

    Insulated metal wall and roof panels offer an exceptional level of value when compared to traditional multi-component wall systems. The product’s unique single-component construction combines outstanding performance with simple and quick installation, a diverse array of aesthetic options, and the quality assurance of a single provider.

    Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 18:00:23 +0000


    ABC Supply Opens New Branch in California


    ABC Supply Opens New Branch in California

    ABC Supply Co. Inc. announced that the company has opened a branch in Antioch, Calif. Tom Hennigan will lead the team of associates at this new ABC Supply branch. According to the company, Hennigan joined ABC Supply’s Oakland, Calif., location in 2016 as an outside sales associate. Prior to joining ABC Supply, Hennigan gained extensive experience with exterior building products as a contractor and salesperson, and he will use the industry knowledge he gained to help local contractors find solutions for their business challenges and achieve their goals.

    The branch is ABC Supply’s first location in Antioch and one of more than 30 locations in California. “We’re excited to be part of the Antioch community and to build trusting, professional relationships with the area’s contractors,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “Our goal is to make it as easy as possible for contractors to have access to the products and expertise they need to tackle their projects.”

    The Antioch branch is located at 2701 Verne Roberts. Branch hours are 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. PDT, Monday through Friday, and 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. PDT on Saturday. The phone number is (925) 779-1437. 

    Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 20:35:51 +0000


    Low-Rise Adhesive Now Available in Larger Containers


    Low-Rise Adhesive Now Available in Larger Containers

    Mule-Hide Products Co. now offers Helix Low-Rise Adhesive in 15-gallon pony kegs and 50-gallon drums for use in completing larger jobs. According to the manufacturer, Helix Low-Rise Adhesive provides quick, clean adhesion of approved roof insulations, thermal barriers, cover boards and fleece-backed single-ply membranes to a wide variety of acceptable roofing substrates. The two-component, construction-grade polyurethane foam is applied in a single step, saving crews time and hassle. 

    Both parts of the adhesive (Part A and Part B) are ready to use from the container – no mixing required – and are applied simultaneously in a 1:1 ratio through a static mix tip. The adhesive is applied in continuous ribbons or beads spaced 4, 6 or 12 inches apart, depending on the project and code requirements. There is no overspray. The adhesive cures fully in just minutes.
     
    A pony keg covers approximately 2,350-7,000 square feet of roof and a drum covers approximately 8,350-25,000 square feet of roof, depending on bead spacing and substrate properties. Containers of Part A and Part B are priced separately but must be purchased as a set.
     
    According to the company, the adhesive is odorless and solvent-free and contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), making it crew-, building occupant- and environment-friendly.
     
    The adhesive eliminates the need for mechanical fasteners, maintaining a puncture-free vapor retarder, preventing thermal bridging and protecting the structural integrity of the roof deck. The adhesive provides superior wind uplift resistance, allowing it to be used on taller buildings and buildings in higher wind zones. In addition, it provides exceptional hail resistance when used as an adhesive for fleece-backed membranes. 
     
    In addition to the pony kegs and drums, Helix Low-Rise Adhesive remains available in cartridge twin-pack tubes (covering approximately 125-400 square feet of roof) and two-tank sets (covering approximately 1,000-3,000 square feet of roof). 

    Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 23:00:19 +0000


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


    New Product Line Secures Rooftop Pipes and Struts


    New Product Line Secures Rooftop Pipes and Struts

    Green Link has introduced a family of custom-engineered, molded straps and caps for securing pipes and struts for its KnuckleHead rooftop support product line. Straps have been designed for both Heavy Pipe and Strut Support KnuckleHeads, while a cap design was developed for Lite Pipe Supports. All are molded from tough, weatherproof urethane and feature a striking “safety yellow” color.

    The Heavy Pipe KnuckleHead strap secures a 3-inch outside diameter pipe, while the Strut Support strap fits steel or aluminum Unistrut-type channel. The Lite Pipe Support cap is designed to secure a single 1-inch nominal pipe or two ½-inch nominal pipes. Pipe supports are attached with standard stainless-steel sheet metal screws, which are supplied with the heads. The Strut Support straps are available in nominal pipe sizes ranging from ¼ inch to 6 inches. Custom straps are available by special order. These elastomeric straps slide into the strut channel and snap in place, eliminating the need for screws.

    “We custom engineered these products to fit the unique shape of our head designs,” said Ondrej Pekarovic, Green Link design engineer. “There is growing interest in securing rooftop mechanical installations in the face of high wind conditions and seismic events. These straps will greatly increase the stability of pipes, conduit, channel and related mechanical equipment. Additionally, they satisfy local code requirements.”

    Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 13:40:50 +0000


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


    Grupo Resilient International, Inc. Names Julian Lopez to Lead Deployment of Emergency Response & Disaster Recovery Teams


    Grupo Resilient International, Inc. Names Julian Lopez to Lead Deployment of Emergency Response & Disaster Recovery Teams

    ADDISON, Texas — Grupo Resilient International, Inc., a publicly traded company recently announced that Julian Lopez, a FEMA approved contractor and OSHA instructor, has joined the board of directors of its infrastructure subsidiary, Resilient Infrastructure, Inc. which is currently mobilizing workers for disaster assistance in Houston, Texas and the surrounding areas. GRUI can also mobilize far more workers and equipment under its network of companies which subcontract and offer support services to disaster relief efforts. GRUI is currently deploying workers experienced in demolition, debris-removal, clean-up, waste-hauling and waste disposal.

    Additionally, GRUI is also preparing to deploy a network of mobile broadband trailers, “MBT’s” capable of providing gigabit internet speeds to assist and support in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey through its recent investment in Metroplex Networks, Inc. Once GRUI completes deploying the MBT’s and connecting them to a hybrid microwave and fiber-broad backbone to support mission critical communications infrastructure in Houston, GRUI plans to begin re-building critical infrastructure, commercial, retail, industrial and residential buildings affected by Hurricane Harvey. Lopez has extensive expertise and experience gained in disaster recovery, roofing, construction and shoring in the aftermath of Katrina. Lopez said, “We are poised, ready and proud to be able to utilize our past expertise and experience to mitigate the damages and losses to those affected by Harvey.”
     

    Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


    NRCA Launches Silica Webpage to Help Members Comply with OSHA’s New Silica Rule


    NRCA Launches Silica Webpage to Help Members Comply with OSHA’s New Silica Rule

    tile-cut

    On Sept. 23, OSHA began enforcing its long-anticipated final rule on occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) in the workplace. To help its members comply with provisions of the new rule, NRCA has launched a silica web page.

    Launched Sept. 16, the webpage will provide NRCA members with information designed to assist them in adapting to the silica rule’s new regulations including;

    • A PowerPoint presentation contractors can use to facilitate a training session on RCS as required by the rule.
    • Links to outside resources that may be useful for compliance assistance with equipment options, objective data compilations, industrial hygiene and laboratory needs, and plan development.
    • A sample of the required silica exposure control plan for members to edit to their company needs.
    • New Toolbox Talks targeted to roofing tasks that workers may perform.
    • A detailed summary of the RCS rule.

    In roofing, workers can be exposed to RCS when performing tasks that involve abrasive action on concrete and clay roof tiles, concrete pavers, masonry and mortar joints may produce dust particles that, when inhaled, settle into deep portions of the lungs and cause damage.

    “NRCA’s new silica webpage and additional initiatives should assist our members in easing burdens of the silica rule and decrease the risks associated with silica in the roofing industry,” says Harry Dietz, an NRCA director of enterprise risk management.

    In addition to the new webpage, NRCA also has been working with the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, Tile Roofing Institute and many NRCA affiliates to conduct air sampling and testing of roofing materials to determine whether they contain crystalline silica and to what level.

    NRCA members may access the new silica webpage at www.nrca.net/Silica-regulation-resources.

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    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 19:16:44 +0000


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


    GAF Blog


    GAF Blog

    This is the first part in a series of blogs about designing low slope roofs for wind loads.

    Roofing design encompasses many different factors. The assembly is dictated by the use of the building, the owner’s budget, the building’s location, local building codes, energy codes, and the forces of nature that are regularly, as well as occasionally unleashed upon it. In addition, a change in one part of the building envelope can adversely affect something else. As this implies, there are often many choices that the designer has to make. It is important to note that the installer also has a great effect upon the overall performance of the system. Communication between the designer and the installer is paramount to the success of the system. The designer needs to relay exactly what components should comprise the assembly, as well as how the system should be installed. Conversely, the installer should alert the designer of any conditions or potential changes that do not match the plans and specification, since a small change can affect the entire envelope.

    Communication between the designer and the installer is paramount to the success of the system.

    Let’s talk about golf for a moment. A 300 yard drive has exactly the same value on the score card as a 6 inch putt. The same is true on the roof. If the installer omits sealant and a clamp on a pipe flashing detail because the incorrect one was displayed in the plans, it has the same result as a cold-welded seam: Water in the building. So nearly every detail, no matter how small, can have the same effect. One such mishap may be small, but like strokes on the scorecard, they all add up.

    There are certain details that often get overlooked. Sometimes specifications and plans don’t match. If that happens, which one prevails? Sometimes plans trump details, others the opposite is true. Very often, perhaps in the interest of conserving time or effort, a specification or plan detail will state to comply with an established standard, such as those published by FM (Factory Mutual, which does its own system testing for its member insurance companies), SMACNA (Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association), or the International Plumbing Code without specifying which exact detail or practice. One very common mistake, for example, is specifying FM 1-105 on an OSB deck, but FM doesn’t test over combustible decks. So according to FM, a system over an OSB deck wouldn’t be rated to withstand 105 pounds per square foot, or PSF, of uplift pressure. Perhaps, in that case, it would be better to outline specific enhanced fastening patterns or fastener pull out values.

    Sometimes specifications and plans don’t match. If that happens, which one prevails?

    The designer of record can possibly open themselves up to liability if they leave details up to the installer’s interpretation. Quite often, trades will mix and match responsibility of interfacing details, such as components of drains, counterflashing roof edge termination, coping cap waterproofing, and HVAC transitions to name a few. Returning to the situation where FM 1-105 over an OSB deck has been specified, the designer should ideally have consulted with the membrane manufacturer to identify options that have been demonstrated to conform to established standards. Good and experienced suppliers do a lot of system testing to understand how to achieve required levels of performance with as many options as feasible.

    Wind Uplift – The Basics

    Wind Pressure

    Wind uplift, in general, is the upward force pulling on the building components as a result of wind blowing around and over the building. The roof is naturally exposed to these forces due to its location. When the wind flow moves over the edge of the roof it creates negative pressure. In addition, positive pressure exerted from inside the building from HVAC and openings such as doors and windows can also contribute to these forces, depending upon the building’s construction.

    Edges are Critical

    Roof Field

    Corners and perimeter zones are especially vulnerable to wind uplift forces due to their proximity to the edge. Vortices are created at corners, which can increase the upward pull. The next illustration is a top view of the roof, identifying perimeter and corner zones. As a rule of thumb, attachment (uplift resistance) is enhanced at a rate of 1.5x at the perimeter and 2x in the corner to combat these forces. Roof edge termination is especially critical, since it is at the leading edge holding the roof to the structure.

    This fully adhered TPO roof was peeled back from the edge during a wind event, separating insulation layers.

    This fully adhered TPO roof was peeled back from the edge during a wind event, separating insulation layers.

    Roof edge termination is instrumental in resilience to these forces. Remember the golf analogy? Well, nearly every detail counts the same on the score card. Imagine this: You are on the 8th tee just starting your backswing when a meteor the size of a 1966 Volkswagen Beetle crashes in the middle of the fairway leaving a huge smoking crater. This is not simply a stroke, but instead, it is a catastrophic ending to the game (and quite a story). The same is true with the roof edge. A few years ago, the National Roofing Contractors Association, NRCA, independently tested numerous roof edge terminations. Mark Graham, the Vice President of Technical Services for the NRCA stated in an article featured in Professional Roofing magazine, “…flexural failure during edge metal testing is much more common than fastener pull-out…” The act of just adding more fasteners will not suffice, because if the metal is an insufficient gauge for the application, it will flex, allowing wind to lift it. It is reasonable to assume that when the edge catches air, the rest of the system is likely to follow like dominoes.

    Roof edge termination is especially critical, since it is at the leading edge holding the roof to the structure.

    Attention to Detail

    So, if edges are critical, what is to be done? Ideally two things are recommended; first, instead of a general reference to compliance with SMACNA standards, it would be prudent to call out the exact detail that should be applied in specific locations. Second, the specifier may want to designate which trade is the best to be responsible for each detail, as opposed to leaving the decision up to the trades to decide what to include or exclude within their respective scopes. If a SMACNA detail is to be applied, then perhaps a sheet metal contractor may be the better choice to be responsible for that scope.

    Picture1

    TP-3 Courtesy of NRCA Guidelines for Single-ply Membrane Roof Systems

    Take a moment to look at one common example from the NRCA, which is generally understood to be considered “good roofing practice.” Shown above is Detail TP-3 from the NRCA Guidelines for Single-ply Membrane Roof Systems.

    The field membrane extends over the roof edge, and down the wood nailer, and is secured by the fastening of the anchoring cleat on the face. The thermoplastic (TPO or PVC) coated metal is then placed on top of the membrane and fastened based upon the Architectural Metal Flashing Securement options found within the NRCA Roofing manual. That detail is completed with a hot air welded flashing strip that ties the roof membrane to the Thermoplastic coated metal for a watertight assembly. That is a roofing detail to be installed by a roofer.

    Imagine for a moment that the owner wanted to save some money; would you, as the designer, decide to do it here?

    Keep in mind that even though the assembly may qualify for a standard warranty, the owner is still exposed to the inconvenience of dealing with replacement, as well as collateral damage such as lost wages due to clean up, lost merchandise due to damage, and lost use of space while waiting for repair. There are other ways for a designer to save money on the assembly that do not significantly increase the risk of the roof blowing off. Remember the meteor?

    The diagram on the right is from ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11. Picture2This document establishes standards for roof edge details as they relate to wind uplift resistance based upon actual testing from collaboration with ANSI (American National Standards Institute), SPRI (Single Ply Roofing Industry), and FM (Factory Mutual). It illustrates one of the methods of testing the edge termination. This demonstrates a mechanically attached system with the same detail as above (NRCA TP-3). A load is applied to the field membrane at a 25 degree angle from the deck to simulate the stresses of the field sheet billowing.

    How would the less expensive alternate detail fare in this test?

    …even though the assembly may qualify for a standard warranty, the owner is still exposed to the inconvenience of dealing with replacement…

    The table below is from ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11:

    ANSI chart

    Courtesy of ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ES-1-11

    Pay special attention to a few things; first it shows the recommended minimum gauge for each metal (a thicker gauge can be specified for added strength), second it is based upon the width of the exposed metal, so the wider it is, the thicker it should be. ES-1-11 outlines design criteria for wind uplift for edge details. This document is created as a guide to keep roofs where they belong.

    Wrapping it Up

    The designer of record, whether an Architect or a Consultant, should be decisive, and choose specific appropriate details. The owner is looking for a roof that is resilient, cost effective, and does not cause any problems. Keep ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11 close, and don’t risk your reputation in the hands of the lowest bidder. Ask any golf pro and they will tell you that putting is 40% of your game, so you had better make it 40% of your practice.

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    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


    Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

    The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

    By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

    After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

    Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

    The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

    The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

    Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

    Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

    The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

    Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

    Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000