Roof Coatings Are Here To Stay


Elastomeric roofing or roof coatings, as it is frequently called, is one kind of synthetic roofing product that is a structure of recycled rubber. This rubber is being cracked off in the rubber mill and the little chips are blended with various chemicals to manufacture the RRPV (Recycled Rubber Poyurethane Elastomer) or the EPDM (Ehtylene Propylene Diene Monomer). To be able to come up with ultra violet (UV) filtering ability, manufacturers of rubber roof typically include pulverized stone, limestone, or slate to the mixture. It also boosts the look of the product and its resilience.

To do the installation of elastomeric roofing, it has to have an underlayment. But prior to the building work is left for the day, roofers ought to have already ended up using the membrane roofing underlayment. The factor for this is to avoid water to get in when rain takes place unexpectedly as this will wet up the interiors of the framework like the plywood and insulation board. And if this happens without awareness, there is a big propensity that sooner or later moisture on the insulation board or the plywood will cause the product to be easily damaged.

Elastomeric roofing might be applied with elastomeric finish in liquid kind and “rubber-like” protective membranes. During the progress of the building work, it might function as a maintenance and defense for the rubber roof for possible leak or tearing down. Using rubber finishing doesn’t just repair works frustrating leaks but it can assist in saving money due to its heat reflectivity. But proper coating selection ought to be done, as not all elastomeric coatings are the same. They might vary in toughness, adhesion, and in a few of its mechanical homes such as tensile strength and elongation. Your roofing expert can get you the best guidance on this.

As compared to clay tile roofing, elastomeric roofing is 100% percent water resistant because of its anti-porous residential or commercial property. It is also fire-resistant and a single-ply application is all that is needed. Because of its UV filtering capability, the material has the ability to withstand against ultraviolet radiation, gases, as well as snow and ice. This kind of roofing material can last from 40 years onwards, depending upon the durability of the rubber.

If you live in a location where temperature can go as low as 20 degree Celsius, do not ever consider utilizing this kind of roofing product. Elastomeric roofings are not really flexible in low temperature levels. Have other options all set, or think about moving to another place if you would truly prefer to use rubber roofing for your structure.

click for more info on roof coatings


Western Specialty Contractors Branches Serve as Staging Locations for Gulf Coast Disaster Recovery Services


Western Specialty Contractors Branches Serve as Staging Locations for Gulf Coast Disaster Recovery Services

ST. LOUIS — Losing a structure or building to an unforeseen natural disaster, such as flooding or the recent hurricanes in Florida and Texas, can be devastating to the owner and its tenants.

The decision to move forward with repairs may not come quickly, but when it does, facility managers and owners should work with a specialty contractor experienced in disaster recovery to get the job done correctly and efficiently.  Western Specialty Contractors’ branch offices in Atlanta, Ga.; Houston and San Antonio, Texas and Orlando, Fla. have been helping companies recover from natural disasters on the Gulf Coast for over 50 years.

“Bringing a building or structure back to life in the case of a natural disaster takes a certain level of experience and skill,” said Chester Scott, branch manager of Western’s Atlanta branch. “Special skills are needed to properly assess the damage, develop a recovery plan and initiate the restoration or take steps to mitigate further loss.”

Disaster recovery services provided by Western Specialty Contractors include:

  • Building exterior stabilization
  • Emergency building enclosure
  • Roofing repair and replacement
  • Window boarding, repair and replacement
  • Interior demolition
  • General clean up
  • Masonry and concrete repair
  • Historic restoration

When Hurricane Katrina, one of the five deadliest and costliest hurricanes in the history of the United States, struck the Gulf Coast in 2005, Western Specialty Contractors was there to help.

South Shore Harbour Marina features one of the largest boat slips near the New Orleans Lakefront Airport overlooking Lake Pontchartrain. Hurricane Katrina left the covered slips unusable and virtually unrecognizable. Western crews worked to remove any remaining damaged panels and purlins and completely replaced the outer skin of the slips (approximately 30,000 square feet) with interlocking Berridge Zee-Lock panels. Western also replaced the guard house that overlooked the harbor with a new modular version and made renovations to the public restroom and oil containment facilities, which all suffered severe wind and flood damage during the hurricane.

That same year, Western Specialty Contractors came to the rescue of Florida-based Ardaman & Associates after they noticed some leaking windows in their building, resulting from the recent hurricane activity.

Western crews came out and surveyed the building before making a recommendation to re-seal all of the glass-to-glass, metal-to-glass and metal-to-concrete window joints throughout the entire building. The result was a watertight building and a happy owner.

For more information, visit westernspecialtycontractors.com.

Published at Mon, 02 Oct 2017 13:00:00 +0000


New Roof and Building Upgrades Provide Security for Florida Day Care Center


New Roof and Building Upgrades Provide Security for Florida Day Care Center

The Joseph Caleb Center

The Joseph Caleb Center received a building envelope upgrade that included a new modified bitumen roof for the low-slope sections and a new standing seam metal roof on steep-slope sections at the perimeter. Photos: Polyglass USA Inc.

The Joseph Caleb Center in Miami caters to a very young clientele, but the building housing the early childhood education center was definitely showing its age. The existing roof was failing, the concrete walls were cracked, and the window seals were broken. The restoration project was a complicated one, with several roof and wall systems that had to be tied in together. Luckily, that’s just the type of project Errol Portuondo likes. Portuondo is the owner of Florida Building & Supply in Miami, which focuses primarily on commercial restoration and re-roofing projects. The company restored the building, topping it with a new self-adhered, modified bitumen roof system and crowning it with a standing seam metal roof around the perimeter.

“We handle the whole envelope,” Portuondo notes. “That’s what sets us apart. That’s our niche. We like to go into these projects that have four, five, six items—the kind of projects other companies avoid. Most people like to handle the easy stuff—get in and get out. We like to tackle the harder type projects that require a lot of thinking.”

Complicated Scope of Work

The project required a roof system that was Energy Star rated and would comply with South Florida’s requirements for high velocity hurricane zones. Furthermore, the building would remain open during the roofing installation process, so the roof system could not give off any fumes or volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A self-adhered modified bitumen roof system from Polyglass USA Inc. was chosen for the flat roof sections because of its high reflectivity, durability, and ease of installation, as well as the lack of any odor.

The existing roof consisted of a mechanically attached modified system surrounded by a standing seam metal roof. Florida Building & Supply first removed the metal roof system, as it partially covered the flat roof. After the steep-slope sections were dried in with 30-pound felt and Englert MetalMan HT self-adhered underlayment, crews began to tear off the old modified system. Everything was removed down to the lightweight insulating concrete (LWIC) that had been installed over the metal deck.

The day care center

The day care center was open during the restoration project, so the safety plan included moving the children’s playground during the roof installation. Photos: Polyglass USA Inc.

The specification called for adhering polyiso insulation directly to the lightweight with OlyBond 500 adhesive from OMG Roofing Products, so making sure the LWIC was in good shape was crucial. Core samples were taken of the roof and subjected to a series of adhesion and compression tests required by the county. “We passed all of the tests and got all of the approvals regarding the lightweight, and we installed the insulation and the Polyglass system on top of that,” Portuondo says. “We like using that system because it is easy to install and allows us to salvage the lightweight. It also gives you really great uplift resistance.”

Crews installed tapered polyiso insulation manufactured by Hunter Panels to a custom-designed layout provided by ABC Supply Co. Insulation ranged in thickness from more than 5 inches to a minimum of 1 ½ inches. After the existing roof system was removed, Portuondo realized that the deck could not be penetrated without potentially damaging the structure, affecting the placement of emergency overflows. “Some of the existing buildings weren’t designed like they are today, so you have to work with the existing drains and make sure you can take care of the water through emergency overflows if any drains should get clogged,” he says.

After the insulation was installed, the 20,000-square-foot low-slope section was ready for the Polyglass three-ply, self-adhered modified bitumen roof system. Elastoflex SA V, a self-adhered SBS modified bitumen membrane, was used for the base and interply sheets. The surface layer consisted of Polyfresko G SA, a white, self-adhered APP modified bitumen cap sheet manufactured with CURE Technology, a thin-film technology designed to improve the membrane’s durability, UV and stain resistance, and granule adhesion.

“What we like about the self-adhered system is that you can move on the roof quick and clean,” Portuondo says. “Sometimes the intake of the mechanical units is up on the roof, and with a hot asphalt application, you have to be careful with any fumes. That’s not a consideration with the self-adhered system. It’s very clean and very fast, especially if you are about to get a rainstorm. You can get a barrier installed very quickly on the roof as opposed to hot asphalt or a torch system.”

Details, Details

Once the new low-slope roof was installed, work began on the new standing seam metal roof manufactured by Englert. Tying in the metal roof with the modified roof was relatively easy, according to Portuondo, but other details were more problematic.

The last steps included perimeter metal trim and gutters. “We work closely with the manufacturers based on their inspection process and when there are certain details,” notes Portuondo. “In this specific project, there were a lot of details.”

Waterproofing the skylights

Waterproofing the skylights was tricky, as the glass extended under the metal roof and ended just a few inches from the new modified bitumen roof system. In these sections, Polyflash 2C, an odor free, fluid-applied flashing system from Polyglass, was used. Photos: Polyglass USA Inc.

Florida Building & Supply also handled repairing and painting the perimeter of the building. Hairline fractures in the concrete block walls were repaired with epoxy injections prior to painting. Crews also re-caulked and waterproofed all of the windows and skylights, including glass walls that extended under the metal roof at the top and ended at the bottom just a few inches from the modified roof system.

“That tie-in was very difficult because by the time you ended your base flashings for the modified, you were right at the glazing,” Portuondo says. “For those areas, the only solution was the Polyglass Polyflash 2C kit.” Polyflash 2C is an odor free, fluid-applied flashing system that is UV-stable.

Setting up the plan of attack in advance was crucial, notes Portuondo, but with any older building, you have to be ready to adapt as the job progresses. “You don’t really know structurally what you’re going to run into until you start to tear off,” he says. “Sometimes what you find under the roof turns out to be different than you expected, and you have to make changes in the field.”

Safety is always the top concern for both employees and members of the public, notes Portuondo. “We moved the playground area and set up a safety perimeter fence,” he explains. “We made sure the children would not be harmed while we were installing the roof, so that was a logistical problem.”

The company is used to overcoming logistical problems. “Our forte is re-roofing existing buildings, and so they are always active,” he says. “We strive to do quality work and stay on top of everything. We’ve just been doing this for so long that we know what we’re doing.”

Published at Mon, 02 Oct 2017 17:00:05 +0000


Ribble: Roofing Contractor Certification Program Would Transform Roofing Industry


Ribble: Roofing Contractor Certification Program Would Transform Roofing Industry

A certification program for roofing contractors scheduled to launch early next year has the potential to transform the roofing industry in United States forever, said Reid Ribble, CEO of the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA).

The initiative, which begins with trainer instruction later this month, will be designed to elevate the industry to the level of other trade professions with existing national standards and protocols, like electricians and plumbers.

Published at Mon, 02 Oct 2017 15:40:00 +0000


Snowstorm in the Gym


Snowstorm in the Gym

I was recently introduced to Mike Pickel, co-founder of Texas Traditions Roofing in Georgetown, Texas. We were busy preparing case studies for our education issue, so I asked him if he’d worked on any interesting school projects lately. He replied, “Well, I did just get a call about a snowstorm in the gym.”

It took a second to wrap my head around that statement. A snowstorm. In the gym. In July. In Texas.

Now, that got my attention. I must admit, that wasn’t at all what I was thinking about when I asked about projects for our education issue. Our case studies usually put the spotlight on marquee projects like the new basketball arena at Ole Miss or the new indoor football practice facility at Liberty University covered in this issue. We were also following stories about a metal roof on a new construction project in Texas, a large hot-mopped modified bitumen re-roofing project in New Jersey, and a solar installation on a school in North Carolina.

But a snowstorm in the gym—I had to hear more about that. Talking with Mike Pickel reminded me that trophy projects are one thing, but there are a lot of less glamorous but no less important tasks that can make up the typical day in the life of a roofing contractor.

Texas Traditions had helped out at Summit Christian Academy in Cedar Park, Texas, before, solving some tricky leaks in the mechanical wells over the classrooms that had puzzled other contractors for years. “They started saying we were miracle workers,” Pickel recalls. “I said, ‘No, we’re just roofers, ma’am.’ But they just loved us from that day forward.”

So, it was natural that school administrators called Texas Traditions when an unusual problem revealed itself in the gym. “They called us and said, ‘We’ve got a problem out here. We don’t know what’s going on. It looks like it’s snowing in the gym.’”

Pickel doubted it was a roof leak, but he went out and took a look. “It did look just like snow,” he says.

Luckily, Pickel had seen this once before. Years ago, he had a residential customer with the same problem—army ants. “Sure enough, army ants were up there just eating away at that iso, and it was falling down like snow through any crevices or cracks.”

Working with the private school to handle small problems is just part of the job, notes Pickel. So is helping administrators manage their budget to prepare for necessary re-roofing projects. “In some cases, we have to patch these roofs and nurse them along until they have the money for a roof replacement,” he says. “You do what you have to do to help a client. So, now we’re a pest control guy as well.”

Replacing a roof is something building owners might do just once in their lives, so explaining what’s involved is critical, notes Pickel. “You’ve got to educate the owner,” he says. “You’ve got to go out and craft a custom solution for each client. That’s what we tell our residential roof advisors all the time: Stop selling and listen to the client. That’s key for us. We excel at listening to the client and problem solving.”

Listen to clients and come up with a plan to meet their specific needs. That’s great advice no matter what line of work you’re in.

Published at Mon, 02 Oct 2017 17:10:51 +0000


Take a Proactive Approach When it Comes to Fleet Management


Take a Proactive Approach When it Comes to Fleet Management

RCS Influencer Brian Pratt says that contractors can reduce insurance costs by implementing a fleet management program.

Many roofing professionals continue to be impacted by an increase in automobile insurance costs due to a substantial rise in the frequency and severity of auto claims. Severe losses can expose the assets of a roofing company if they are not properly managed. We have seen firsthand that a relatively low-impact (typically rear-end accidents) auto claims reach six and even seven figure ranges. The main contributor to auto claims is distracted driving.

With 27 years of experience in the roofing industry we have developed some proven strategies to help roofing professionals reduce their cost of risk over time. One of these strategies is fleet risk management program implementation.

We have assisted many of our roofing clients with an aggressive and pro-active approach to auto accident mitigation. Our fleet management program begins with pre-employment testing (gauging the personality of a prospective employee’s driving habits and potential for injuries, which could also impact work comp), implementing a written and formal fleet management program, scheduling of driver awareness training, implementing a fleet accountability program, and formalized post-accident claims handling process for cost effective claims closure.

The formal fleet management program consists of monitoring the use of company vehicles (if vehicles are allowed to be taken home) and the use of personal vehicles (if employees use their own vehicle during company time) during business hours. The fleet accountability program consists of monitoring company vehicles through a third party (1-800- How’s my driving).

We also have assisted some of our roofing clients exploring programs that help prevent distracted driving, which can help with the reduction of auto and work comp claims. A cell phone can be shut down while in the driver’s seat, eliminating the use of phones for email, texts, etc., while the company vehicle is on or in motion Also, many of our roofing clients have implemented GPS tracking systems in their vehicles to help increase their productivity, control fuel cost and increase safety and risk management while monitoring the use of the company vehicles speed and braking habits.

If you would like to learn more about fleet safety and risk management programs please contact me at 407-493-2121

Brian Pratt is a regional manager for Roofing Risk Advisors, a Division of Furman Insurance. See his full bio here.

Published at Mon, 02 Oct 2017 10:55:19 +0000