Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


GAF Blog


GAF Blog

This is the first part in a series of blogs about designing low slope roofs for wind loads.

Roofing design encompasses many different factors. The assembly is dictated by the use of the building, the owner’s budget, the building’s location, local building codes, energy codes, and the forces of nature that are regularly, as well as occasionally unleashed upon it. In addition, a change in one part of the building envelope can adversely affect something else. As this implies, there are often many choices that the designer has to make. It is important to note that the installer also has a great effect upon the overall performance of the system. Communication between the designer and the installer is paramount to the success of the system. The designer needs to relay exactly what components should comprise the assembly, as well as how the system should be installed. Conversely, the installer should alert the designer of any conditions or potential changes that do not match the plans and specification, since a small change can affect the entire envelope.

Communication between the designer and the installer is paramount to the success of the system.

Let’s talk about golf for a moment. A 300 yard drive has exactly the same value on the score card as a 6 inch putt. The same is true on the roof. If the installer omits sealant and a clamp on a pipe flashing detail because the incorrect one was displayed in the plans, it has the same result as a cold-welded seam: Water in the building. So nearly every detail, no matter how small, can have the same effect. One such mishap may be small, but like strokes on the scorecard, they all add up.

There are certain details that often get overlooked. Sometimes specifications and plans don’t match. If that happens, which one prevails? Sometimes plans trump details, others the opposite is true. Very often, perhaps in the interest of conserving time or effort, a specification or plan detail will state to comply with an established standard, such as those published by FM (Factory Mutual, which does its own system testing for its member insurance companies), SMACNA (Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association), or the International Plumbing Code without specifying which exact detail or practice. One very common mistake, for example, is specifying FM 1-105 on an OSB deck, but FM doesn’t test over combustible decks. So according to FM, a system over an OSB deck wouldn’t be rated to withstand 105 pounds per square foot, or PSF, of uplift pressure. Perhaps, in that case, it would be better to outline specific enhanced fastening patterns or fastener pull out values.

Sometimes specifications and plans don’t match. If that happens, which one prevails?

The designer of record can possibly open themselves up to liability if they leave details up to the installer’s interpretation. Quite often, trades will mix and match responsibility of interfacing details, such as components of drains, counterflashing roof edge termination, coping cap waterproofing, and HVAC transitions to name a few. Returning to the situation where FM 1-105 over an OSB deck has been specified, the designer should ideally have consulted with the membrane manufacturer to identify options that have been demonstrated to conform to established standards. Good and experienced suppliers do a lot of system testing to understand how to achieve required levels of performance with as many options as feasible.

Wind Uplift – The Basics

Wind Pressure

Wind uplift, in general, is the upward force pulling on the building components as a result of wind blowing around and over the building. The roof is naturally exposed to these forces due to its location. When the wind flow moves over the edge of the roof it creates negative pressure. In addition, positive pressure exerted from inside the building from HVAC and openings such as doors and windows can also contribute to these forces, depending upon the building’s construction.

Edges are Critical

Roof Field

Corners and perimeter zones are especially vulnerable to wind uplift forces due to their proximity to the edge. Vortices are created at corners, which can increase the upward pull. The next illustration is a top view of the roof, identifying perimeter and corner zones. As a rule of thumb, attachment (uplift resistance) is enhanced at a rate of 1.5x at the perimeter and 2x in the corner to combat these forces. Roof edge termination is especially critical, since it is at the leading edge holding the roof to the structure.

This fully adhered TPO roof was peeled back from the edge during a wind event, separating insulation layers.

This fully adhered TPO roof was peeled back from the edge during a wind event, separating insulation layers.

Roof edge termination is instrumental in resilience to these forces. Remember the golf analogy? Well, nearly every detail counts the same on the score card. Imagine this: You are on the 8th tee just starting your backswing when a meteor the size of a 1966 Volkswagen Beetle crashes in the middle of the fairway leaving a huge smoking crater. This is not simply a stroke, but instead, it is a catastrophic ending to the game (and quite a story). The same is true with the roof edge. A few years ago, the National Roofing Contractors Association, NRCA, independently tested numerous roof edge terminations. Mark Graham, the Vice President of Technical Services for the NRCA stated in an article featured in Professional Roofing magazine, “…flexural failure during edge metal testing is much more common than fastener pull-out…” The act of just adding more fasteners will not suffice, because if the metal is an insufficient gauge for the application, it will flex, allowing wind to lift it. It is reasonable to assume that when the edge catches air, the rest of the system is likely to follow like dominoes.

Roof edge termination is especially critical, since it is at the leading edge holding the roof to the structure.

Attention to Detail

So, if edges are critical, what is to be done? Ideally two things are recommended; first, instead of a general reference to compliance with SMACNA standards, it would be prudent to call out the exact detail that should be applied in specific locations. Second, the specifier may want to designate which trade is the best to be responsible for each detail, as opposed to leaving the decision up to the trades to decide what to include or exclude within their respective scopes. If a SMACNA detail is to be applied, then perhaps a sheet metal contractor may be the better choice to be responsible for that scope.

Picture1

TP-3 Courtesy of NRCA Guidelines for Single-ply Membrane Roof Systems

Take a moment to look at one common example from the NRCA, which is generally understood to be considered “good roofing practice.” Shown above is Detail TP-3 from the NRCA Guidelines for Single-ply Membrane Roof Systems.

The field membrane extends over the roof edge, and down the wood nailer, and is secured by the fastening of the anchoring cleat on the face. The thermoplastic (TPO or PVC) coated metal is then placed on top of the membrane and fastened based upon the Architectural Metal Flashing Securement options found within the NRCA Roofing manual. That detail is completed with a hot air welded flashing strip that ties the roof membrane to the Thermoplastic coated metal for a watertight assembly. That is a roofing detail to be installed by a roofer.

Imagine for a moment that the owner wanted to save some money; would you, as the designer, decide to do it here?

Keep in mind that even though the assembly may qualify for a standard warranty, the owner is still exposed to the inconvenience of dealing with replacement, as well as collateral damage such as lost wages due to clean up, lost merchandise due to damage, and lost use of space while waiting for repair. There are other ways for a designer to save money on the assembly that do not significantly increase the risk of the roof blowing off. Remember the meteor?

The diagram on the right is from ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11. Picture2This document establishes standards for roof edge details as they relate to wind uplift resistance based upon actual testing from collaboration with ANSI (American National Standards Institute), SPRI (Single Ply Roofing Industry), and FM (Factory Mutual). It illustrates one of the methods of testing the edge termination. This demonstrates a mechanically attached system with the same detail as above (NRCA TP-3). A load is applied to the field membrane at a 25 degree angle from the deck to simulate the stresses of the field sheet billowing.

How would the less expensive alternate detail fare in this test?

…even though the assembly may qualify for a standard warranty, the owner is still exposed to the inconvenience of dealing with replacement…

The table below is from ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11:

ANSI chart

Courtesy of ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ES-1-11

Pay special attention to a few things; first it shows the recommended minimum gauge for each metal (a thicker gauge can be specified for added strength), second it is based upon the width of the exposed metal, so the wider it is, the thicker it should be. ES-1-11 outlines design criteria for wind uplift for edge details. This document is created as a guide to keep roofs where they belong.

Wrapping it Up

The designer of record, whether an Architect or a Consultant, should be decisive, and choose specific appropriate details. The owner is looking for a roof that is resilient, cost effective, and does not cause any problems. Keep ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11 close, and don’t risk your reputation in the hands of the lowest bidder. Ask any golf pro and they will tell you that putting is 40% of your game, so you had better make it 40% of your practice.

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Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Antis Roofing and American Family Housing Join Forces to Address Local Homelessness


Antis Roofing and American Family Housing Join Forces to Address Local Homelessness

IRVINE, Calif. —  Antis Roofing & Waterproofing recently announced a collaborative roofing project with partner, American Family Housing (AFH). AFH is a nonprofit organization based in Orange County, dedicated to permanently ending the cycle of homelessness by providing a continuum housing and necessary services to homeless and low-income families. For over 30 years, AFH has forged alliances with community partners to help combat the issue of homelessness.

As part of its mutual commitment to provide community partners addressing housing issues with skills-based support, Antis Roofing & Waterproofing will work with AFH and other corporate partners on Sept. 18, 2017 to repair the roof of the Van Buren Property, located at 15272 Van Buren Street in Midway City. This project would not be possible without the generous donations of time, money and resources of our partners on this build.

“Our team and partners have put words into action, by making good on the promise to support American Family Housing with this important project,” said Charles Antis, CEO of Antis Roofing & Waterproofing. “I committed to this project a year ago, knowing that we had the team, resources and ability to make this a reality. American Family Housing is impacting the lives of many people, and this project is one way we can thank them for the work they do.”

“From our family to yours, IB Roof Systems is proud to support the American Family Housing Project in bringing families homes of their own,” said Jason Stanley, chief executive officer, IB Roof Systems.

For more information, visit www.antisroofing.com.

Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Former NRCA President, Tecta America Co-Founder Don McNamara has Died


Former NRCA President, Tecta America Co-Founder Don McNamara has Died

The roofing industry is mourning the loss of one its long-time leaders in Don McNamara.

McNamara, 81, was the former owner of Milwaukee-based F.J.A. Christiansen Roofing Co., Inc. (FJAC) for decades and was an influential figure in both regional and national roofing associations.

A graduate of Marquette University Law School, McNamara became a CPA and started his professional career as a tax attorney. He then joined one of his clients and became majority owner of FJAC in 1967. He retired in 1995, but rejoined his family business to lead it toward the consolidation of companies that formed Tecta America Corp. in 2000.

“It is a rare talent to have someone like Don who could manage and control all the type-A people at the beginning of Tecta’s formation,” Said Kim Schwickert, a Tecta co-founder and chairman of Schwickerts. “Without that calm personality I think Tecta would never have gotten off the ground.”

He served as the company’s first CEO and later on its board of directors.

“Don was an imposing man – physically as well as intellectually – but also warm, caring and a lot of fun,” said current Tecta President and CEO Mark Santacrose. “He was the first person I met at Tecta in 2001 and he taught me a ton about the company, the roofing industry and the cast of characters that made up Tecta at the time. He cast a huge shadow and it was my privilege to follow him in my role and my honor to know him.”

McNamara had several roles with the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA), and ultimately served as president from 1986 to 1987. He was a past recipient of the NRCA’s J.A. Piper Award, and the Midwest Roofing Contractors Association’s James Q. McCawley Award, the highest awards bestowed by each organization.

Current NRCA CEO and Wisconsin native Reid Ribble said McNamara was instrumental in getting him involved in the organization decades ago, and was often a mentor in business.

“He was a giant in our industry and will be sorely missed,” Ribble said.

McNamara is survived by his wife Valerie, their 3 children and 9 grandchildren.
Visitation will be at St. Jerome Catholic Church in Oconomowoc, Wis., on Saturday, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Memorial contributions may be made to Shorehaven, Salvation Army and St. Jerome Catholic Church.

Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 19:03:00 +0000


Have a Policy for Side Jobs and Moonlighting


Have a Policy for Side Jobs and Moonlighting

RCS Influencer Michael Hicks says this his company allows side jobs but with conditions.

Our policy is fairly simple and straightforward. Side jobs are permitted with a few qualifiers:

  1. It can’t be any larger than 10 squares. If it’s bigger than 10 squares have the owner contact us and if we get the job there’s a commission for the reference.
  2. If you do a side job, you need to buy the materials from the company
  3. In no way can a side job interfere with your work duties at the company
  4. Work for a competitor and you’re done

Although I recently had several guys doing a weekend side job for a “company,” if you could call a pick-up truck and some hand tools out of the garage a “company,” which had supposedly shut their doors.  We had bid the job, and I’m sure we were quite a bit more expensive.  I guess the promise of one last good job was too much temptation for the retired owner, and the guy waved some big bucks in the face of a guy that came to work for us when the other place closed down.  This individual got several of our other guys to help him, and they were spotted on the roof on a Saturday.

All of them were excellent guys, losing them all for a lapse in judgement would have been tough and they were given the ultimatum to grab their tools and exit the roof immediately as HRI employees, or stay and finish the job as ex-employees.  They all chose to leave, and a thunderstorm passed overhead an hour later.  Not sure what happened, don’t care, but I see the job got finished eventually.

Michael Hicks is owner of Hicks Industrial Roofing. See his full bio here.

Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 16:28:04 +0000


Reliant Roofing Surprises Three Local Families with New Roofs


Reliant Roofing Surprises Three Local Families with New Roofs

Jacksonville, Fla. —  Reliant Roofing recently announced that the three finalists selected for its first annual Every Shingle Heart giveaway will all receive new roofs. Their Every Shingle Heart initiative was created to give back to the community by providing a free roof to a local family in need. Once the nominations came in, the Jacksonville company realized they could not choose just one family. On Aug. 22, they invited all three finalists to the Reliant Roofing office and surprised them with the news.

Angela Billings, Toni Luther and Ruby McMullen all experienced roof damage from Hurricane Matthew. They were ecstatic to learn that they would be receiving brand new roofs. McMullen, who’s on disability, often went without groceries so she could pay her bills on time. Though her home desperately needed a new roof after Matthew, it was out of reach for her. She’ll no longer have to worry.

Luther’s roof damage from Matthew was so severe that she was about to lose her home if it was not replaced. Her daughter Tina, a disabled Veteran, returned home to try to help. “There’s mildew and mold because of the water. It’s been leaking now since the storm,” Velazquez said. “She really couldn’t maintain it because of her health, and so it’s been one thing after the other and I’m trying to pick up the pieces.”

Billings, who recently underwent a double mastectomy and lost her fiancé, is grateful that she and her son will no longer have to worry about constant leaks damaging her home. “Every time it rains, we have some new leak. It’s been difficult ever since Hurricane Mathew,” she says. Now she has hope. She says, “Cancer and losing somebody you love, there’s always someone who has it worse than you. I know it sounds terrible, but it’s true. You look around and you think my life isn’t so bad.”

Reliant Roofing owners Sean Shapiro and Cameron Shouppe were touched by the stories of these local families. Shouppe says, “As soon as I saw their reaction I knew we found the right people. This was a major item causing stress and grief in their life and this was going to make a huge difference for them.” The company looks forward to giving these three deserving families a fresh start.

For more information, visit www.reliantroofing.com/everyshingleheart.

Published at Wed, 20 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000