Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


New Product Line Secures Rooftop Pipes and Struts


New Product Line Secures Rooftop Pipes and Struts

Green Link has introduced a family of custom-engineered, molded straps and caps for securing pipes and struts for its KnuckleHead rooftop support product line. Straps have been designed for both Heavy Pipe and Strut Support KnuckleHeads, while a cap design was developed for Lite Pipe Supports. All are molded from tough, weatherproof urethane and feature a striking “safety yellow” color.

The Heavy Pipe KnuckleHead strap secures a 3-inch outside diameter pipe, while the Strut Support strap fits steel or aluminum Unistrut-type channel. The Lite Pipe Support cap is designed to secure a single 1-inch nominal pipe or two ½-inch nominal pipes. Pipe supports are attached with standard stainless-steel sheet metal screws, which are supplied with the heads. The Strut Support straps are available in nominal pipe sizes ranging from ¼ inch to 6 inches. Custom straps are available by special order. These elastomeric straps slide into the strut channel and snap in place, eliminating the need for screws.

“We custom engineered these products to fit the unique shape of our head designs,” said Ondrej Pekarovic, Green Link design engineer. “There is growing interest in securing rooftop mechanical installations in the face of high wind conditions and seismic events. These straps will greatly increase the stability of pipes, conduit, channel and related mechanical equipment. Additionally, they satisfy local code requirements.”

Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 13:40:50 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Grupo Resilient International, Inc. Names Julian Lopez to Lead Deployment of Emergency Response & Disaster Recovery Teams


Grupo Resilient International, Inc. Names Julian Lopez to Lead Deployment of Emergency Response & Disaster Recovery Teams

ADDISON, Texas — Grupo Resilient International, Inc., a publicly traded company recently announced that Julian Lopez, a FEMA approved contractor and OSHA instructor, has joined the board of directors of its infrastructure subsidiary, Resilient Infrastructure, Inc. which is currently mobilizing workers for disaster assistance in Houston, Texas and the surrounding areas. GRUI can also mobilize far more workers and equipment under its network of companies which subcontract and offer support services to disaster relief efforts. GRUI is currently deploying workers experienced in demolition, debris-removal, clean-up, waste-hauling and waste disposal.

Additionally, GRUI is also preparing to deploy a network of mobile broadband trailers, “MBT’s” capable of providing gigabit internet speeds to assist and support in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey through its recent investment in Metroplex Networks, Inc. Once GRUI completes deploying the MBT’s and connecting them to a hybrid microwave and fiber-broad backbone to support mission critical communications infrastructure in Houston, GRUI plans to begin re-building critical infrastructure, commercial, retail, industrial and residential buildings affected by Hurricane Harvey. Lopez has extensive expertise and experience gained in disaster recovery, roofing, construction and shoring in the aftermath of Katrina. Lopez said, “We are poised, ready and proud to be able to utilize our past expertise and experience to mitigate the damages and losses to those affected by Harvey.”
 

Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


NRCA Launches Silica Webpage to Help Members Comply with OSHA’s New Silica Rule


NRCA Launches Silica Webpage to Help Members Comply with OSHA’s New Silica Rule

tile-cut

On Sept. 23, OSHA began enforcing its long-anticipated final rule on occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) in the workplace. To help its members comply with provisions of the new rule, NRCA has launched a silica web page.

Launched Sept. 16, the webpage will provide NRCA members with information designed to assist them in adapting to the silica rule’s new regulations including;

  • A PowerPoint presentation contractors can use to facilitate a training session on RCS as required by the rule.
  • Links to outside resources that may be useful for compliance assistance with equipment options, objective data compilations, industrial hygiene and laboratory needs, and plan development.
  • A sample of the required silica exposure control plan for members to edit to their company needs.
  • New Toolbox Talks targeted to roofing tasks that workers may perform.
  • A detailed summary of the RCS rule.

In roofing, workers can be exposed to RCS when performing tasks that involve abrasive action on concrete and clay roof tiles, concrete pavers, masonry and mortar joints may produce dust particles that, when inhaled, settle into deep portions of the lungs and cause damage.

“NRCA’s new silica webpage and additional initiatives should assist our members in easing burdens of the silica rule and decrease the risks associated with silica in the roofing industry,” says Harry Dietz, an NRCA director of enterprise risk management.

In addition to the new webpage, NRCA also has been working with the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, Tile Roofing Institute and many NRCA affiliates to conduct air sampling and testing of roofing materials to determine whether they contain crystalline silica and to what level.

NRCA members may access the new silica webpage at www.nrca.net/Silica-regulation-resources.

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Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 19:16:44 +0000