Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


GAF Blog


GAF Blog

This is the first part in a series of blogs about designing low slope roofs for wind loads.

Roofing design encompasses many different factors. The assembly is dictated by the use of the building, the owner’s budget, the building’s location, local building codes, energy codes, and the forces of nature that are regularly, as well as occasionally unleashed upon it. In addition, a change in one part of the building envelope can adversely affect something else. As this implies, there are often many choices that the designer has to make. It is important to note that the installer also has a great effect upon the overall performance of the system. Communication between the designer and the installer is paramount to the success of the system. The designer needs to relay exactly what components should comprise the assembly, as well as how the system should be installed. Conversely, the installer should alert the designer of any conditions or potential changes that do not match the plans and specification, since a small change can affect the entire envelope.

Communication between the designer and the installer is paramount to the success of the system.

Let’s talk about golf for a moment. A 300 yard drive has exactly the same value on the score card as a 6 inch putt. The same is true on the roof. If the installer omits sealant and a clamp on a pipe flashing detail because the incorrect one was displayed in the plans, it has the same result as a cold-welded seam: Water in the building. So nearly every detail, no matter how small, can have the same effect. One such mishap may be small, but like strokes on the scorecard, they all add up.

There are certain details that often get overlooked. Sometimes specifications and plans don’t match. If that happens, which one prevails? Sometimes plans trump details, others the opposite is true. Very often, perhaps in the interest of conserving time or effort, a specification or plan detail will state to comply with an established standard, such as those published by FM (Factory Mutual, which does its own system testing for its member insurance companies), SMACNA (Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association), or the International Plumbing Code without specifying which exact detail or practice. One very common mistake, for example, is specifying FM 1-105 on an OSB deck, but FM doesn’t test over combustible decks. So according to FM, a system over an OSB deck wouldn’t be rated to withstand 105 pounds per square foot, or PSF, of uplift pressure. Perhaps, in that case, it would be better to outline specific enhanced fastening patterns or fastener pull out values.

Sometimes specifications and plans don’t match. If that happens, which one prevails?

The designer of record can possibly open themselves up to liability if they leave details up to the installer’s interpretation. Quite often, trades will mix and match responsibility of interfacing details, such as components of drains, counterflashing roof edge termination, coping cap waterproofing, and HVAC transitions to name a few. Returning to the situation where FM 1-105 over an OSB deck has been specified, the designer should ideally have consulted with the membrane manufacturer to identify options that have been demonstrated to conform to established standards. Good and experienced suppliers do a lot of system testing to understand how to achieve required levels of performance with as many options as feasible.

Wind Uplift – The Basics

Wind Pressure

Wind uplift, in general, is the upward force pulling on the building components as a result of wind blowing around and over the building. The roof is naturally exposed to these forces due to its location. When the wind flow moves over the edge of the roof it creates negative pressure. In addition, positive pressure exerted from inside the building from HVAC and openings such as doors and windows can also contribute to these forces, depending upon the building’s construction.

Edges are Critical

Roof Field

Corners and perimeter zones are especially vulnerable to wind uplift forces due to their proximity to the edge. Vortices are created at corners, which can increase the upward pull. The next illustration is a top view of the roof, identifying perimeter and corner zones. As a rule of thumb, attachment (uplift resistance) is enhanced at a rate of 1.5x at the perimeter and 2x in the corner to combat these forces. Roof edge termination is especially critical, since it is at the leading edge holding the roof to the structure.

This fully adhered TPO roof was peeled back from the edge during a wind event, separating insulation layers.

This fully adhered TPO roof was peeled back from the edge during a wind event, separating insulation layers.

Roof edge termination is instrumental in resilience to these forces. Remember the golf analogy? Well, nearly every detail counts the same on the score card. Imagine this: You are on the 8th tee just starting your backswing when a meteor the size of a 1966 Volkswagen Beetle crashes in the middle of the fairway leaving a huge smoking crater. This is not simply a stroke, but instead, it is a catastrophic ending to the game (and quite a story). The same is true with the roof edge. A few years ago, the National Roofing Contractors Association, NRCA, independently tested numerous roof edge terminations. Mark Graham, the Vice President of Technical Services for the NRCA stated in an article featured in Professional Roofing magazine, “…flexural failure during edge metal testing is much more common than fastener pull-out…” The act of just adding more fasteners will not suffice, because if the metal is an insufficient gauge for the application, it will flex, allowing wind to lift it. It is reasonable to assume that when the edge catches air, the rest of the system is likely to follow like dominoes.

Roof edge termination is especially critical, since it is at the leading edge holding the roof to the structure.

Attention to Detail

So, if edges are critical, what is to be done? Ideally two things are recommended; first, instead of a general reference to compliance with SMACNA standards, it would be prudent to call out the exact detail that should be applied in specific locations. Second, the specifier may want to designate which trade is the best to be responsible for each detail, as opposed to leaving the decision up to the trades to decide what to include or exclude within their respective scopes. If a SMACNA detail is to be applied, then perhaps a sheet metal contractor may be the better choice to be responsible for that scope.

Picture1

TP-3 Courtesy of NRCA Guidelines for Single-ply Membrane Roof Systems

Take a moment to look at one common example from the NRCA, which is generally understood to be considered “good roofing practice.” Shown above is Detail TP-3 from the NRCA Guidelines for Single-ply Membrane Roof Systems.

The field membrane extends over the roof edge, and down the wood nailer, and is secured by the fastening of the anchoring cleat on the face. The thermoplastic (TPO or PVC) coated metal is then placed on top of the membrane and fastened based upon the Architectural Metal Flashing Securement options found within the NRCA Roofing manual. That detail is completed with a hot air welded flashing strip that ties the roof membrane to the Thermoplastic coated metal for a watertight assembly. That is a roofing detail to be installed by a roofer.

Imagine for a moment that the owner wanted to save some money; would you, as the designer, decide to do it here?

Keep in mind that even though the assembly may qualify for a standard warranty, the owner is still exposed to the inconvenience of dealing with replacement, as well as collateral damage such as lost wages due to clean up, lost merchandise due to damage, and lost use of space while waiting for repair. There are other ways for a designer to save money on the assembly that do not significantly increase the risk of the roof blowing off. Remember the meteor?

The diagram on the right is from ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11. Picture2This document establishes standards for roof edge details as they relate to wind uplift resistance based upon actual testing from collaboration with ANSI (American National Standards Institute), SPRI (Single Ply Roofing Industry), and FM (Factory Mutual). It illustrates one of the methods of testing the edge termination. This demonstrates a mechanically attached system with the same detail as above (NRCA TP-3). A load is applied to the field membrane at a 25 degree angle from the deck to simulate the stresses of the field sheet billowing.

How would the less expensive alternate detail fare in this test?

…even though the assembly may qualify for a standard warranty, the owner is still exposed to the inconvenience of dealing with replacement…

The table below is from ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11:

ANSI chart

Courtesy of ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ES-1-11

Pay special attention to a few things; first it shows the recommended minimum gauge for each metal (a thicker gauge can be specified for added strength), second it is based upon the width of the exposed metal, so the wider it is, the thicker it should be. ES-1-11 outlines design criteria for wind uplift for edge details. This document is created as a guide to keep roofs where they belong.

Wrapping it Up

The designer of record, whether an Architect or a Consultant, should be decisive, and choose specific appropriate details. The owner is looking for a roof that is resilient, cost effective, and does not cause any problems. Keep ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435/ ES-1-11 close, and don’t risk your reputation in the hands of the lowest bidder. Ask any golf pro and they will tell you that putting is 40% of your game, so you had better make it 40% of your practice.

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Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Antis Roofing and American Family Housing Join Forces to Address Local Homelessness


Antis Roofing and American Family Housing Join Forces to Address Local Homelessness

IRVINE, Calif. —  Antis Roofing & Waterproofing recently announced a collaborative roofing project with partner, American Family Housing (AFH). AFH is a nonprofit organization based in Orange County, dedicated to permanently ending the cycle of homelessness by providing a continuum housing and necessary services to homeless and low-income families. For over 30 years, AFH has forged alliances with community partners to help combat the issue of homelessness.

As part of its mutual commitment to provide community partners addressing housing issues with skills-based support, Antis Roofing & Waterproofing will work with AFH and other corporate partners on Sept. 18, 2017 to repair the roof of the Van Buren Property, located at 15272 Van Buren Street in Midway City. This project would not be possible without the generous donations of time, money and resources of our partners on this build.

“Our team and partners have put words into action, by making good on the promise to support American Family Housing with this important project,” said Charles Antis, CEO of Antis Roofing & Waterproofing. “I committed to this project a year ago, knowing that we had the team, resources and ability to make this a reality. American Family Housing is impacting the lives of many people, and this project is one way we can thank them for the work they do.”

“From our family to yours, IB Roof Systems is proud to support the American Family Housing Project in bringing families homes of their own,” said Jason Stanley, chief executive officer, IB Roof Systems.

For more information, visit www.antisroofing.com.

Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Former NRCA President, Tecta America Co-Founder Don McNamara has Died


Former NRCA President, Tecta America Co-Founder Don McNamara has Died

The roofing industry is mourning the loss of one its long-time leaders in Don McNamara.

McNamara, 81, was the former owner of Milwaukee-based F.J.A. Christiansen Roofing Co., Inc. (FJAC) for decades and was an influential figure in both regional and national roofing associations.

A graduate of Marquette University Law School, McNamara became a CPA and started his professional career as a tax attorney. He then joined one of his clients and became majority owner of FJAC in 1967. He retired in 1995, but rejoined his family business to lead it toward the consolidation of companies that formed Tecta America Corp. in 2000.

“It is a rare talent to have someone like Don who could manage and control all the type-A people at the beginning of Tecta’s formation,” Said Kim Schwickert, a Tecta co-founder and chairman of Schwickerts. “Without that calm personality I think Tecta would never have gotten off the ground.”

He served as the company’s first CEO and later on its board of directors.

“Don was an imposing man – physically as well as intellectually – but also warm, caring and a lot of fun,” said current Tecta President and CEO Mark Santacrose. “He was the first person I met at Tecta in 2001 and he taught me a ton about the company, the roofing industry and the cast of characters that made up Tecta at the time. He cast a huge shadow and it was my privilege to follow him in my role and my honor to know him.”

McNamara had several roles with the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA), and ultimately served as president from 1986 to 1987. He was a past recipient of the NRCA’s J.A. Piper Award, and the Midwest Roofing Contractors Association’s James Q. McCawley Award, the highest awards bestowed by each organization.

Current NRCA CEO and Wisconsin native Reid Ribble said McNamara was instrumental in getting him involved in the organization decades ago, and was often a mentor in business.

“He was a giant in our industry and will be sorely missed,” Ribble said.

McNamara is survived by his wife Valerie, their 3 children and 9 grandchildren.
Visitation will be at St. Jerome Catholic Church in Oconomowoc, Wis., on Saturday, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Memorial contributions may be made to Shorehaven, Salvation Army and St. Jerome Catholic Church.

Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 19:03:00 +0000


Have a Policy for Side Jobs and Moonlighting


Have a Policy for Side Jobs and Moonlighting

RCS Influencer Michael Hicks says this his company allows side jobs but with conditions.

Our policy is fairly simple and straightforward. Side jobs are permitted with a few qualifiers:

  1. It can’t be any larger than 10 squares. If it’s bigger than 10 squares have the owner contact us and if we get the job there’s a commission for the reference.
  2. If you do a side job, you need to buy the materials from the company
  3. In no way can a side job interfere with your work duties at the company
  4. Work for a competitor and you’re done

Although I recently had several guys doing a weekend side job for a “company,” if you could call a pick-up truck and some hand tools out of the garage a “company,” which had supposedly shut their doors.  We had bid the job, and I’m sure we were quite a bit more expensive.  I guess the promise of one last good job was too much temptation for the retired owner, and the guy waved some big bucks in the face of a guy that came to work for us when the other place closed down.  This individual got several of our other guys to help him, and they were spotted on the roof on a Saturday.

All of them were excellent guys, losing them all for a lapse in judgement would have been tough and they were given the ultimatum to grab their tools and exit the roof immediately as HRI employees, or stay and finish the job as ex-employees.  They all chose to leave, and a thunderstorm passed overhead an hour later.  Not sure what happened, don’t care, but I see the job got finished eventually.

Michael Hicks is owner of Hicks Industrial Roofing. See his full bio here.

Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 16:28:04 +0000


Reliant Roofing Surprises Three Local Families with New Roofs


Reliant Roofing Surprises Three Local Families with New Roofs

Jacksonville, Fla. —  Reliant Roofing recently announced that the three finalists selected for its first annual Every Shingle Heart giveaway will all receive new roofs. Their Every Shingle Heart initiative was created to give back to the community by providing a free roof to a local family in need. Once the nominations came in, the Jacksonville company realized they could not choose just one family. On Aug. 22, they invited all three finalists to the Reliant Roofing office and surprised them with the news.

Angela Billings, Toni Luther and Ruby McMullen all experienced roof damage from Hurricane Matthew. They were ecstatic to learn that they would be receiving brand new roofs. McMullen, who’s on disability, often went without groceries so she could pay her bills on time. Though her home desperately needed a new roof after Matthew, it was out of reach for her. She’ll no longer have to worry.

Luther’s roof damage from Matthew was so severe that she was about to lose her home if it was not replaced. Her daughter Tina, a disabled Veteran, returned home to try to help. “There’s mildew and mold because of the water. It’s been leaking now since the storm,” Velazquez said. “She really couldn’t maintain it because of her health, and so it’s been one thing after the other and I’m trying to pick up the pieces.”

Billings, who recently underwent a double mastectomy and lost her fiancé, is grateful that she and her son will no longer have to worry about constant leaks damaging her home. “Every time it rains, we have some new leak. It’s been difficult ever since Hurricane Mathew,” she says. Now she has hope. She says, “Cancer and losing somebody you love, there’s always someone who has it worse than you. I know it sounds terrible, but it’s true. You look around and you think my life isn’t so bad.”

Reliant Roofing owners Sean Shapiro and Cameron Shouppe were touched by the stories of these local families. Shouppe says, “As soon as I saw their reaction I knew we found the right people. This was a major item causing stress and grief in their life and this was going to make a huge difference for them.” The company looks forward to giving these three deserving families a fresh start.

For more information, visit www.reliantroofing.com/everyshingleheart.

Published at Wed, 20 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Intricate Roof Meets Refined Design of Coastal Florida Lifestyle Complex


Intricate Roof Meets Refined Design of Coastal Florida Lifestyle Complex

ELK GROVE VILLAGE, Ill. – Serving as a gateway to Florida’s scenic highway 30A, the new 30Avenue mixed-use development is within easy walking distance to several famed beaches on northwest Florida’s panhandle. The distinctive complex offers 130,000 sq. ft. of combined retail and office space. The architecture and landscape of 30Avenue merge sophisticated design with the area’s natural beauty and relaxed coastal lifestyle.
 
30Avenue is composed of one- and two-story buildings clad with white stucco and covered with standing seam metal roofing. Approximately 30,000 sq. ft. of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD .040” aluminum Snap-Clad panels were utilized in a multi-phase installation. The PAC-CLAD panels were finished in Cool Color Cityscape, which was chosen to complement the extensive white stucco, and black shutters and awnings.
 
Design for the project was created by Dougherty Architecture + Design in Destin, Fla. “Our design intent was to create a retail/office complex that was reflective of the nearby beach environment and lifestyle,” said Joe Dougherty, principal. “With nice landscaping and a variety of interesting shapes and forms highlighted by a complex roof design, the project is really engaging.”
 
The Petersen Cityscape color was an important aesthetic factor, Dougherty noted. “Cityscape really enhances the white stucco,” he said. “And, of course, we used aluminum because of the harsh coastal environment. Aluminum stands up well against the weather and the saltwater.”
 
Dougherty Architecture has previous experience with PAC-CLAD products. “Petersen is a manufacturer we usually specify. And the Snap-Clad performance specs met all of our requirements for wind uplift, UV protection, ease of application and warranty,” Dougherty said.
 
Installation of the Petersen panels was done by Ameritech Roofing in Panama City, Fla. Ameritech project manager Philip Jorgenson agreed with architect Dougherty about the complexity of the roof design. “There were lots of different pitches and intersecting planes,” Jorgenson said. “We did extensive custom detailing on site. When you design a complex building like that, you can’t draw every detail. You see what the framers built and then figure out how to flash it. We ordered the panels in general sizes and then cut them to fit on-site. It’s a very efficient way to maximize use of the material. We were really close on the cut list.”
 
Jorgenson also agreed with Dougherty’s opinion of the Snap-Clad profile. “Snap-Clad is a popular panel that we like to use because of the wind rating and the aesthetics of it and because it doesn’t require mechanical seaming,” Jorgenson said. He also likes working with Petersen. “They provide a great product and they’re good people to work with. If there is an issue, they take care of it right away. We’re really pleased with our Petersen relationship,” Jorgenson reports.

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Published at Wed, 20 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Roofing Companies Form Asphalt Underlayment Council


Roofing Companies Form Asphalt Underlayment Council

Four roofing companies—Carlisle, Gardner-Gibson, Maryland Paper and Mid-States Asphalt—have formed the Asphalt Underlayment Council (AUC), a new industry association developed to cultivate the long-term success of underlayment products for building envelope applications for both residential and commercial structures.

This new group’s Interim Executive Council was instrumental in identifying the need for an industry council that supports the standardization of underlayment product quality, performance and integrity. Current AUC members include Owens Corning, Polyglass USA, Mule-Hide Manufacturing, GMC Roofing & Building Paper, GAP Roofing, Warrior Roofing Manufacturing and GAF

“With the introduction of new types of roofing underlayment products, it was felt that an industry group was needed to monitor, administer and contribute to product standards,” noted AUC Executive Director Michelle Miller.

Because standards and requirements for roof repair, reroofing, roof recovering and replacement often lack clarification within the definition of underlayment, AUC’s inaugural technical committee will focus on code classifications and industry regulations.

“The pathways to code compliance vary depending on the product type,” said John Woestman, AUC’s technical director. “The continuous influx of newly designed products and ever-evolving regulations requires a strong knowledge base with deep understanding of the codes prevalent in this industry.”

Bringing regulatory issues to light through educational initiatives and industry outreach will be accomplished through raising awareness and advocacy. AUC will actively assist in the development of building codes to ensure the high performance of roofing systems in the future.

“We will work directly with installers and contractors who may not be aware of the various product categories that are occurring in the underlayment industry,” said Robert Almon, AUC Interim Executive Council member. “Understanding the nuances of underlayment as well as discerning codes and comprehending code compliance are vital. With our combined historical experience, AUC is in a prime position to ensure all the issues surrounding underlayment are addressed through a range of resources from an engaged council, committees and membership to a vibrant website that will be launched soon, growing media outreach, literature development and ongoing educational opportunities.”

The group welcomes roofing underlayment firms to join AUC to work to make these important initiatives viable and sustainable. To learn more about the Asphalt Underlayment Council or to ask about membership, email info@aucunderlaymentcouncil.org or call (847) 686-2243.

Published at Thu, 21 Sep 2017 13:00:55 +0000


Allied Building Products Corp. Exterior Division Announces Opening of Marmora, N.J. Location


Allied Building Products Corp. Exterior Division Announces Opening of Marmora, N.J. Location

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Allied Building Products Corp. recently announced the expansion of its exterior products division in the New Jersey market with its new branch located in Marmora, N.J.  

The Marmora branch opened its doors on Sept. 1, 2017 providing a solid addition to the company’s strong foundation of 17 branches servicing the exterior and interior markets in New Jersey.  The expansion positions Allied to better serve the Jersey Shore and surrounding communities including; Ocean City, Margate, Seaville, Sea Isle City, Cape May Courthouse, Stone Harbor and Wildwood.  

Featuring both residential and commercial roofing and siding, the branch will carry trusted brands including shingles from GAF, Tamko and Owens Corning, siding and pvc trim from Royal and Tri-Built materials. To complement these brands there will be a range of doors, windows and stone veneer products available. 

Branch Manager, Derek Webber will oversee the Marmora location and will work with District Manager, Phil Orapello bringing a wealth of knowledge and experience to the new location.   

“Allied Building Products proudly continues its expansion into the Jersey Shore community bringing expertise, honesty and integrity to the community to help both restore the shore and keep it on a path to grow” said Orapello. “We look forward to servicing contractors, builders and consumers with the unmatched levels of customer service Allied is known for.” 

For more information, visit www.alliedbuilding.com.

Published at Thu, 21 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


H.B. Fuller Agrees to Purchase Royal Adhesives & Sealants


H.B. Fuller Agrees to Purchase Royal Adhesives & Sealants

H.B. Fuller Company, a global developer and manufacturer of proprietary adhesives and sealants, announced it has signed an agreement to purchase Royal Adhesives & Sealants, a manufacturer of specialty adhesives and sealants.

“This accretive acquisition accelerates realization of our 2020 strategic objective to focus and grow in engineering adhesives and other highly specified market segments, while exceeding our targeted cash flow, EPS and EBITDA margin targets,” said H.B. Fuller President and Chief Executive Officer Jim Owens. “With Royal’s strong customer relationships and experienced team, we will add depth and breadth to our portfolio. Royal’s complementary offerings will expand our presence in North America, Europe and China, and add new technology and capabilities. We have identified $35 million in cost synergies and $15 million in growth synergies that we expect to realize over the next three years as a result of merging these two great adhesives businesses. Upon closing the transaction, H.B. Fuller will be a company with nearly $2.9 billion in revenue, focused on profitable growth in attractive engineering, durable assembly, and construction adhesives markets.”

Royal is expected to generate approximately $650 million in revenue and $138 million in adjusted EBITDA for H.B. Fuller’s fiscal year 2017. The company operates 19 manufacturing facilities in five countries, and employs approximately 1,500 people globally.

The agreed upon purchase price is $1,575 million, subject to customary adjustments. H.B. Fuller intends to finance the transaction through new debt financing. H.B. Fuller has previously announced specific financial goals for organic growth, cash flow and EBITDA margin improvement in the company’s 2020 strategic plan and believes this acquisition will support acceleration and over performance relative to these objectives. Royal is a supplier of industrial adhesives in a diverse set of end markets, including commercial roofing, aerospace, transportation, insulating glass, solar, packaging and flooring applications. With this acquisition, H.B. Fuller will gain product technology and add people and skills that will result in a more capable and dynamic company for customers and employees, according to the company. H.B. Fuller remains committed to maintaining its current dividend and rapid deleveraging using the significant free cash flow it expects to have available for this purpose.

Subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals, the transaction is expected to close as soon as October of 2017. Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC is acting as H.B. Fuller’s sole financial advisor in relation to this acquisition, and Faegre Baker Daniels LLP is acting as H.B. Fuller’s legal counsel. H.B. Fuller is acquiring Royal from affiliates of American Securities LLC, based in New York with an office in Shanghai.

Published at Wed, 20 Sep 2017 20:00:48 +0000


New ASTM International Standard Supports Green Roofs


New ASTM International Standard Supports Green Roofs

W. CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa. — ASTM International’s committee on roofing and waterproofing has created a new standard that will help professionals design and install membranes for “green roofs,” which support sustainability.

This standard (D8014, Guide for Selection of Membranes Used in Vegetative Roofing Systems) offers various options for reviewing the membrane installation before and after the vegetative components are put in place.  In particular, the guide helps ensure good water management systems.

“This guide will help identify the various conditions a designer should be aware of as well as when choosing a roofing membrane for a vegetative system,” says ASTM International member Joe Schwetz, vice president of technical service at Sika Sarnafil in Canton, Mass., USA.

Designers and building owners should find this new guide most useful.

For more information about ASTM International standards on sustainable construction, go here.

Published at Tue, 19 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Vortex Breaker Strainer Dome


Vortex Breaker Strainer Dome

AGAWAM, Mass. – OMG Roofing Products has introduced the Vortex Breaker Strainer Dome for retrofitting the industry’s most popular retrofit drains – OMG Hercules Drains. The new strainer dome with built in vortex breaker technology is designed for better performance by helping to improve water flow from the roof.

According to independent studies, when upgraded with the Vortex Breaker Strainer Dome, Hercules Drains offer up to 2.5 times greater flow capacity than Hercules Drains without vortex breaker technology.  Faster water flow off the roof also means that the drains get excessive weight off the roof faster.

Published at Tue, 19 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Roofing Contractor Announces the 2017 Residential, Commercial Contractors of the Year


Roofing Contractor Announces the 2017 Residential, Commercial Contractors of the Year

Each year, Roofing Contractor magazine honors the residential and commercial contractors that employ industry best practices, take care of their employees, and excel at quality workmanship and customer satisfaction.

The coveted industry awards for 2017 went to Power Home Remodeling, of Chester, Pa., in the residential category, and KPost Roofing & Waterproofing of Dallas on the commercial side.

Published at Tue, 19 Sep 2017 14:45:00 +0000


Vortex Breaker Strainer Dome Improves Drain Performance


Vortex Breaker Strainer Dome Improves Drain Performance

OMG Roofing Products introduces the Vortex Breaker Strainer Dome for retrofitting OMG Hercules Drains. The new strainer dome with built-in vortex breaker technology is designed to improve water flow from the roof. According to the manufacturer, independent studies demonstrate that when upgraded with the Vortex Breaker Strainer Dome, Hercules Drains offer up to 2.5 times greater flow capacity than Hercules Drains without vortex breaker technology. Faster water flow off the roof also means that the drains get excessive weight off the roof faster. In addition, the integrated vortex breaker technology greatly reduces the chugging effect that occurs when a vortex collapses, which can overload the plumbing system.

Vortex Breaker Strainer Domes are made of heavy-duty cast aluminum for long life on the roof. The safety yellow powder coat makes them easily visible on the roof, so they do not pose a trip hazard. The new domes are compatible with all 3-, 4-, 5- and 6-inch OMG Hercules and OMG Aluminum Classic drains, including thermoplastic coated versions, and are installed using only a screwdriver with a #2 square drive.

For additional information, please call the Customer Service team at OMG Roofing Products at (800) 633-3800.

Published at Mon, 18 Sep 2017 17:40:48 +0000


Roofing Contractor Kicks Off Best of Success 2017


Roofing Contractor Kicks Off Best of Success 2017

TUCSON, Ariz — Roofing contractors from across the country gathered in Tucson for the 13th annual Best of Success conference this morning intent on learning ways to grow their businesses while also sharing best practices to uplift the industry as a whole.

Jill Bloom, publisher of host Roofing Contractor magazine, kicked off the event with a reminder of the key mission – connecting contractors in a non-competitive environment designed so that they can learn from one another.

Published at Mon, 18 Sep 2017 16:20:00 +0000


OSHA Issues Proposed Rule to Extend Compliance Deadline for Crane Operator Certification Requirements


OSHA Issues Proposed Rule to Extend Compliance Deadline for Crane Operator Certification Requirements

WASHINGTON, DC – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to extend the employer’s responsibility to ensure crane operator competency and enforcement for crane operator certification to Nov. 10, 2018.

OSHA issued a final rule in Sept. 2014, extending the deadline by three years for crane operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard. The final rule also extended by three years the employer’s responsibility to ensure that crane operators are competent to operate a crane safely.

The agency is now proposing an extension of the enforcement date to address stakeholder concerns over the operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard.

Comments may submitted electronically at http://www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal or by facsimile or mail. See the Federal Register notice for submission details and additional information about this proposed rule. Comments must be submitted by Sept. 29, 2017.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Drone Dispatch with Its Drone Technology Comes to METALCON After Helping Hurricane Harvey Victims


Drone Dispatch with Its Drone Technology Comes to METALCON After Helping Hurricane Harvey Victims

NEWTON, Mass. — Drone Dispatch based in Austin, Texas is exceptionally busy these days, not just with business as usual or preparing for METALCON, the largest international event in the metal construction industry, but with helping expedite Hurricane Harvey insurance claims through drone imaging of Houston’s devastation.

One of the country’s largest commercial insurance property and casualty companies, CNA, recently reached out to Drone Dispatch, a nationwide provider of drone services, to help document the damage so hurricane victims, whose homes were affected, can get their claims processed quickly and begin rebuilding their homes and communities.

Joshua Barnett, president of Drone Dispatch, immediately responded to the emergency call, sending down four crews who have been working around the clock to capture images of the damage. 

“Drones are the first step to getting these people paid out,” said Barnett.  “We closed our corporate office and sent our entire executive team down to help.  We even flew our own personal drones and then bought a boat to help save lives. It was gut-wrenching to see that level of disaster.  It felt like nuclear fallout.  The trees are stripped of their leaves, and there are piles of rubble everywhere.  Although, it was great to see people come together to help each other.  Between the government, charities, businesses and community groups, they are already rebuilding.”

Now, on to Drone Dispatch at METALCON… Drones, one of the most exciting technologies to enter the construction industry, are the focus of Barnett’s session on “Where Drones Meet Metal in the Roofing Industry” on Oct. 18 and 19 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.  He will help attendees understand how drones will help save time, save money, reduce operational risk and provide additional utility.

“The point of my presentation is to provide education and talk about regulations,” said Barnett.  “There is so much misinformation about what drones do, how they work and what the regulations mean.  I will discuss how to pick a drone and what steps you need to take to proceed.  There is a lack of exposure with drones, and it hasn’t occurred to a lot of folks how drone technology can benefit their businesses.”

“There is so much we can do with drones from generic marketing photos, to work progression photos and 3-D models,” said Barnett.  “We can take measurements on roofs, create 3-D roof images and keep folks safe by keeping them off roofs.”            

“Drone Dispatch presents a unique set of product offerings across the board and within each category of business,” said Barnett.  “We have a particular model, which our competitors do not provide.  We become part of an organization.  We have guys already trained.  We are not trying to outfit an organization with people; rather we are trying to outfit it with drones.”

Drone Dispatch was founded by three under 30 — Barnett, his brother Kevin Whatley and their good friend, Chris Bonnet.  It all started over a conversation between Barnett and Bonnet.  Bonnet was a realtor and determined he needed aerial images to remain competitive so he bought a drone and tried it out.  Subsequently, everyone in his business started asking for the technology. Together, they collected a list of four thousand realtors, reached out to them and 40 responded.  Brothers Barnett and Whatley were just a few classes away from college graduation, when Drone Dispatch exploded, and they decided to focus all of their energy on the drone business. Today, they run a successful business with a strong network of pilots.

“The industry is growing rapidly; our goal is to be the #1 drone service provider in the United States,” said Barnett.

“This cutting-edge technology will help the metal construction industry expedite orders and increase sales, while saving time and money,” said Claire Kilcoyne, METALCON show director.  “What normally might take a whole week to accomplish on a large-scale roofing project, drone technology can expedite in a day.  I am so impressed with Drone Dispatch’s knowledge, enthusiasm, and even more so, the youth and relationship of the partners.” 

For more information, visit dispatchadrone.com.

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 13:00:00 +0000


H.B. Fuller to Buy Royal Adhesives & Sealants for $1.58 billion


H.B. Fuller to Buy Royal Adhesives & Sealants for $1.58 billion

ST. PAUL, Minn. — H.B. Fuller Company recently announced that it has signed an agreement to purchase Royal Adhesives & Sealants, a leading manufacturer of high-value specialty adhesives and sealants. This business consistently delivers industry-leading growth rates, EBITDA margins, and free cash flow that are expected to enhance H.B. Fuller’s position as a global leader in the adhesives industry.

“This accretive acquisition accelerates realization of our 2020 strategic objective to focus and grow in engineering adhesives and other highly specified market segments, while exceeding our targeted cash flow, EPS and EBITDA margin targets,” says H.B. Fuller President and Chief Executive Officer Jim Owens. “With Royal’s strong customer relationships and experienced team, we will add depth and breadth to our portfolio. Royal’s complementary offerings will expand our presence in North America, Europe and China, and add new technology and capabilities. We have identified $35 million in cost synergies and $15 million in growth synergies that we expect to realize over the next three years as a result of merging these two great adhesives businesses. Upon closing the transaction, H.B. Fuller will be a company with nearly $2.9 billion in revenue, focused on profitable growth in attractive engineering, durable assembly, and construction adhesives markets.”

Royal is expected to generate approximately $650 million in revenue and $138 million in adjusted EBITDA for H.B. Fuller’s fiscal year 2017. The company operates 19 manufacturing facilities in 5 countries, and employs approximately 1,500 people globally.

The agreed upon purchase price is $1,575 million, subject to customary adjustments. H.B. Fuller intends to finance the transaction through new debt financing. H.B. Fuller has previously announced specific financial goals for organic growth, cash flow and EBITDA margin improvement in the company’s 2020 strategic plan and believes this acquisition will support acceleration and over performance relative to these objectives. Royal is a highly respected supplier of industrial adhesives in a diverse set of end markets, including aerospace, transportation, commercial roofing, insulating glass, solar, packaging and flooring applications. With this acquisition, H.B. Fuller will gain product technology and add people and skills that will result in a more capable and dynamic company for customers and employees. H.B. Fuller remains committed to maintaining its current dividend and rapid deleveraging using the significant free cash flow it expects to have available for this purpose.

Subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals, the transaction is expected to close as soon as October of 2017. Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC is acting as H.B. Fuller’s sole financial advisor in relation to this acquisition, and Faegre Baker Daniels LLP is acting as H.B. Fuller’s legal counsel. H.B. Fuller is acquiring Royal from affiliates of American Securities LLC, based in New York with an office in Shanghai.

For more information, visit www.hbfuller.com or www.royaladhesives.com.

Published at Thu, 14 Sep 2017 17:42:00 +0000


Meet Linda and Jim Eastman of Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing


Meet Linda and Jim Eastman of Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing

Linda, of Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing, was lucky enough to win the Apple watch from our booth at the International Roofing Expo this year.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

We love meeting our contractors in person at events and shows throughout the year and we really like getting to know them better. Jim and Linda Eastman, owners of San Jose, California-based Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing, Inc., stopped to visit us at the International Roofing Expo earlier this year and ended up being selected as the winner of the Apple watch.

We spoke with Jim and Linda on the phone recently to find out how they like the watch and to learn more about them. They were a delight to get to know better.

Starting their roofing business
Jim began his career as a general contractor building condos and doing remodeling work. After a few years, he began to become more interested in roofing. His thinking was that not everyone will need or want to remodel but eventually everyone will need a new roof. So, 38 years ago they started Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing, Inc.

Linda said the two of them work together, she handles administrative functions and Jim reviews paperwork. Although when asked what he does each day, Jim’s answer was that he probably gets in the way more than anything, which resulted in some laughter from Linda. A sense of humor is obviously one of the keys to their 42-year marriage.

The most valuable lesson they have learned about roofing
When this question was asked, Jim’s sense of humor was evident in his immediate answer: “Do not put a pneumatic fastener in your knee.” Trust him on that one. He knows from experience.

Jim did continue and explained that the most valuable thing they have learned is the importance of knowing your numbers. He and Linda both couldn’t stress enough how important this is. In the early 2000’s they joined Certified Contractor’s Network and attended a business planning boot camp where they spent three days analyzing their business, their numbers and really understanding exactly what their costs were.

Asking the right questions is key to your business being successful according to Jim. He says to ask yourself, ‘what should I charge in order to make a profit on the job;’ not ‘what number do I need to bid to get this job?’

Linda and Jim both agreed that having standard operating procedures in place was also invaluable for their business. Especially when it comes to safety. Jim and Linda said safety is their primary concern and they have invested in all the latest and best equipment available. They hold regular safety meetings and ensure that all their safety procedures are being followed.

What makes them smile
When thinking about their roofing business, Jim says that he is so appreciative of all the great customers that have hired them over the years. They have made many strong relationships and have customers tell them they aren’t even going to get other bids because they know and trust the workmanship provided by Eastman.

Linda added that they are also thankful for their valuable employees. She says that spending so much time with their team has helped everyone to understand their vision for the business and she sees the team working hard every day to achieve the goals.

What they like about RCS
When we asked Linda what she likes about Roofers Coffee Shop she told us that she loves the weekly emails and looks forward to receiving them each week.  She’s also a fan of the classified ad section and has used it in the past.

They both think the Coffee Shop is a great resource and really enjoy all the photos we share. (We’re so happy to hear this!)

What about her Apple watch?
Linda was so excited to win the watch but admits she was a little nervous about figuring out how to use it. She said that her daughter told her she was going to love it and that turned out to be the case. Linda said it’s taken her some time to learn what it can do and she “absolutely loves it.” In fact, she told us she just used the heart rate feature the other day at the gym.

We ended our phone call taking about their family and interests outside of the business – definitely two topics that make them smile. Jim and Linda have five children – two girls and three boys – and four grandchildren. Their grandchildren are two sets of twins, one is two girls and the other set a boy and a girl.

When they aren’t working or spending time with family, you might spot Linda and Jim at the Mountain Winery listening to music, see them in a restaurant enjoying a dinner out but the most likely place you’ll see them is anywhere near the beach.

Published at Thu, 14 Sep 2017 17:54:04 +0000


Meet Linda and Jim Eastman of Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing


Meet Linda and Jim Eastman of Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing

Linda, of Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing, was lucky enough to win the Apple watch from our booth at the International Roofing Expo this year.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

We love meeting our contractors in person at events and shows throughout the year and we really like getting to know them better. Jim and Linda Eastman, owners of San Jose, California-based Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing, Inc., stopped to visit us at the International Roofing Expo earlier this year and ended up being selected as the winner of the Apple watch.

We spoke with Jim and Linda on the phone recently to find out how they like the watch and to learn more about them. They were a delight to get to know better.

Starting their roofing business
Jim began his career as a general contractor building condos and doing remodeling work. After a few years, he began to become more interested in roofing. His thinking was that not everyone will need or want to remodel but eventually everyone will need a new roof. So, 38 years ago they started Eastman Roofing & Waterproofing, Inc.

Linda said the two of them work together, she handles administrative functions and Jim reviews paperwork. Although when asked what he does each day, Jim’s answer was that he probably gets in the way more than anything, which resulted in some laughter from Linda. A sense of humor is obviously one of the keys to their 42-year marriage.

The most valuable lesson they have learned about roofing
When this question was asked, Jim’s sense of humor was evident in his immediate answer: “Do not put a pneumatic fastener in your knee.” Trust him on that one. He knows from experience.

Jim did continue and explained that the most valuable thing they have learned is the importance of knowing your numbers. He and Linda both couldn’t stress enough how important this is. In the early 2000’s they joined Certified Contractor’s Network and attended a business planning boot camp where they spent three days analyzing their business, their numbers and really understanding exactly what their costs were.

Asking the right questions is key to your business being successful according to Jim. He says to ask yourself, ‘what should I charge in order to make a profit on the job;’ not ‘what number do I need to bid to get this job?’

Linda and Jim both agreed that having standard operating procedures in place was also invaluable for their business. Especially when it comes to safety. Jim and Linda said safety is their primary concern and they have invested in all the latest and best equipment available. They hold regular safety meetings and ensure that all their safety procedures are being followed.

What makes them smile
When thinking about their roofing business, Jim says that he is so appreciative of all the great customers that have hired them over the years. They have made many strong relationships and have customers tell them they aren’t even going to get other bids because they know and trust the workmanship provided by Eastman.

Linda added that they are also thankful for their valuable employees. She says that spending so much time with their team has helped everyone to understand their vision for the business and she sees the team working hard every day to achieve the goals.

What they like about RCS
When we asked Linda what she likes about Roofers Coffee Shop she told us that she loves the weekly emails and looks forward to receiving them each week.  She’s also a fan of the classified ad section and has used it in the past.

They both think the Coffee Shop is a great resource and really enjoy all the photos we share. (We’re so happy to hear this!)

What about her Apple watch?
Linda was so excited to win the watch but admits she was a little nervous about figuring out how to use it. She said that her daughter told her she was going to love it and that turned out to be the case. Linda said it’s taken her some time to learn what it can do and she “absolutely loves it.” In fact, she told us she just used the heart rate feature the other day at the gym.

We ended our phone call taking about their family and interests outside of the business – definitely two topics that make them smile. Jim and Linda have five children – two girls and three boys – and four grandchildren. Their grandchildren are two sets of twins, one is two girls and the other set a boy and a girl.

When they aren’t working or spending time with family, you might spot Linda and Jim at the Mountain Winery listening to music, see them in a restaurant enjoying a dinner out but the most likely place you’ll see them is anywhere near the beach.

Published at Thu, 14 Sep 2017 17:54:04 +0000


Rooftop Solar or Solar Roof: What’s in Your Pitch?


Rooftop Solar or Solar Roof: What’s in Your Pitch?

I must begin by acknowledging that, for most of you, business is darn good right now. With a few more months left in the roofing season and a fair amount of optimism looking forward to 2018, this may not seem like a very good time to ramp up a new line of business.

Let me once again remind you of the wisdom of President John F. Kennedy, who said, “The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining.”

Published at Thu, 14 Sep 2017 20:00:00 +0000


GAF Receives Industry-Acclaimed Partners of Choice Award For Quality from David Weekley Homes


GAF Receives Industry-Acclaimed Partners of Choice Award For Quality from David Weekley Homes

PARSIPPANY, N.J. — GAF, North America’s largest roofing manufacturer, has been awarded the Partners of Choice Award from David Weekley Homes, the country’s largest privately held builder. GAF received an “A” ranking for quality, one of only twenty-five suppliers to be recognized out of the 200 companies evaluated. This is the eighth time GAF has earned this symbol of excellence.

“We are excited to receive this award again and honored to be recognized for the focus GAF puts on quality across all aspects of the roofing system,” stated Paul Bromfield, chief marketing officer at GAF. “We look forward to continuing our partnership with the David Weekley Homes team.”

Each year, David Weekley Homes challenges their trade partners to provide the highest level of quality products and superior service by ranking them with a proprietary scoring system. One thousand team members from every level of the company are surveyed on the homebuilder’s unique evaluation platform. Each supplier’s scores are averaged and an alpha ranking is assigned relative to other suppliers. Companies achieving a ranking in the top twenty percent are recognized with the nationally acclaimed Partners of Choice Award.

“To be world class, you must get up every day and perform at levels that exceed all others,” said Bill Justus, vice president of supply chain services for David Weekley Homes and chief architect behind the industry-leading supplier evaluation platform. “Our rigorous process allows us to measure each company’s performance and compare it across diverse industries. In essence, we have designed a practical way of measuring world-class excellence. Through their actions, our friends at GAF have proven to be the best of the breed in providing quality products to our team.”

For more information, visit www.gaf.com.

Published at Thu, 14 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Cool Roof Coatings and Urban Heat Islands


Cool Roof Coatings and Urban Heat Islands

As urban areas across the globe have grown in size and density, significant changes have taken place in their landscapes. Buildings, roads, parking lots and other infrastructure have replaced open land and vegetation. Surfaces that were once permeable and moist have become impermeable and dry. As a result, urban regions have become much warmer than their rural surroundings, forming a “heat island” of higher temperatures.

Elevated temperatures in urban heat islands, especially during the summer, may have numerous negative consequences for the environment and quality of life in urban areas. These adverse consequences include increased peak energy consumption, higher risk of brownouts/blackouts, adverse health consequences, and impaired air and water quality.

Published at Wed, 13 Sep 2017 14:00:00 +0000


Heightened Immigration Enforcement by the Trump Administration


Heightened Immigration Enforcement by the Trump Administration

Issues surrounding immigration have been a focal point for employers since the 1986 passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). The effects of that law and its requirements have made the hiring process a source of major concern for many employers — especially roofing contractors. It also created a risk of legal liability that didn’t previously exist. Those concerns and risks are even greater today given the highly publicized focus on  illegal immigration from the Trump administration.

One of President Donald Trump’s first executive orders echoed his campaign commentary related to increased “enforcement of the immigration laws of the United States.” As part of implementation of that executive order, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) hired 10,000 agents to enforce existing immigration laws more effectively. In practical terms, this means that we’re likely to see a major increase in workplace audits (notices of inspection), something that was almost entirely eliminated during the Obama years. Unfortunately, that period of greatly diminished enforcement actions has, in many cases, led to reduced employer attention to I-9 compliance. The result has been a loss of focus on the necessity of fully complete and correct I-9s.  

Published at Wed, 13 Sep 2017 16:00:00 +0000


Retain Quality Employees: See What This Contractor is Doing About Employee Retention


Retain Quality Employees: See What This Contractor is Doing About Employee Retention

Karen L. Inman, President and COO at Antis Roofing & Waterproofing shares her company’s strategy to find and retain quality employees.

At RoofersCoffeeShop we hear from contractors every day who are challenged with finding skilled labor and retaining employees. The topic is so hot right now that we asked our RCS Influencers last month to share some of their employee retention practices. Their replies were diverse and full of good ideas.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that the demand for roofers is projected to grow 13 percent between 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Construction and roofing companies no longer fuss over finding work – instead they worry about finding people to do the work.

We recently came across this interview with Karen Inman, President and COO at Antis Roofing & Waterproofing that we felt had additional valuable information to share. While she mentions California specifically since that is where her company is located, the challenges apply throughout the U.S. and Canada. Read on to find out how Antis Roofing & Waterproofing plans to stay ahead of the curve.

Question: What, specifically, does Antis look for during its hiring process to attract employees that are looking for a career in roofing versus simply a job?

Karen Inman: I would say it’s about having aligned values and understanding how purpose and giving back fits with each candidate. We have a very prominent and consistent social media presence that starts the “hiring” process by sharing who we are as a company right from the beginning. Then in our conversations with candidates, we talk about how Antis fits with their aspirations while also discussing what charitable giving speaks to them. Knowing where someone spends time giving back gives us a greater understanding of who they are. It also allows us to reinforce the importance we place on being a company who cares and wants to make a difference and allows us to choose employees who have similar values.

Q: Roofing and other skilled labor jobs are learned through practice rather than simply education. Does Antis have any sort of apprenticeship or learning opportunities for employees who might have less experience?

KI: On the field side, Antis provides training to entry level technicians under an informal program of matching more experienced field leads with those who are new to roofing or just new to a specific type of installation (PVC versus tile, for example). The importance of a more formal training and certification program isn’t lost on Antis. We are actively involved with NRCA which is helping establish a certification program for roofing. This will help elevate the industry and provide a pipeline of technicians to help mitigate the growing labor shortage.

We also believe that working with the future generations of roofers to teach them about the industry and the options they have in their careers is another way we’re working to combat the labor shortage. During this past summer, we had a few interns help us with office operations. In fact, two of those internships were provided to local teens as part of their school’s graduation readiness for students who are underserved. This was truly inspiring to be able to offer young people an opportunity to contribute to the company while developing skills and understanding of what career options they may want to pursue – Human Resources, Marketing, Customer Service, or Accounting. In addition, I’d like to think that we set a standard for what these young people will expect in a company culture and hopefully when it comes time, they’ll consider Antis a promising option for their careers.

Q: Since there is a lot of mobility within the skilled-worker space due to supply and demand, it makes sense that companies who can retain quality workers fare better than those who can’t. Once these employees are hired, what are some specific retention strategies Antis has in place?

KI: New hires are welcomed with Antis branded gifts, given an employee orientation, and taken to a team lunch on the first day. They’re also announced in our weekly team huddle so that they feel a part of the Antis team from day one, as we want them to feel our excitement about them joining our team! Another specific strategy is a 90-day onboarding plan for new employees to establish expectations and create a foundation for open communication about their role and how it fits into the success of the organization. Tasks are divided into 30/60/90 day increments and focus on the core duties of their role but also on creating relationships with other team members and developing a basic understanding of all departments.

Q: In summary, how does Antis address the shortage of roofing professionals in California?

KI: It’s just like you all said – we aim to hire talent that is interested in growing their career with Antis and then work with them to ensure they have the skills and professional development to feel as invaluable to our team as they are. Our overall retention strategy for employees is to focus on employee engagement. The strategy approaches retention from the perspective of an employee’s job, their cause and purpose, their connection to each other and the company, and to sharing in the company’s success through a bonus program. Specifically, we ensure each employee gets a formal review as well as more frequent employee surveys where ongoing updates on the progress on initiatives are made and updated based on their input. We also like to hold weekly team huddle meetings where every Antis employee can voice their opinions and help improve processes. Antis adds a little bit of atypical fun into our retention strategy as well. At Antis, we hand out weekly giving cards where an individual who has gone above and beyond to help the team is recognized and then a donation is made to a cause of their choice. It’s a great way to see what is important to our team members and for them to share a little something about themselves that might not otherwise come up! Add that to our company picnics and holiday events, and we really believe Antis is doing what it can to make us a great place to work!

Published at Wed, 13 Sep 2017 15:14:29 +0000


SRS Distribution Expands Hurricane Relief Fund to Include Victims of Irma


SRS Distribution Expands Hurricane Relief Fund to Include Victims of Irma

SRS Distribution recently annouced that they’re expanding the scope of the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund to include those who have been directly affected by Hurricane Irma in the past few days.   

As with Hurricane Harvey, the extent of the damage and destruction by Irma has yet to be seen, but it’s most certainly severe.  

To date — 323 individuals and organizations have contributed $174,077.00 to support the victims of Hurricane Harvey. With the SRS match, the company has currently raised $348,154.00 for their relief fund. 

In expanding the scope of this fund, the company is also extending the SRS Distribution matching component to include all contributions received through Wednesday, Sept. 20.  By adding this third week of matched fundraising, the company believes it can reach the new goal of $250,000.00, for a total of 
$500,000.00 in funds raised for the victims of these two storms. 

To make a contribution directly to this fund that will be matched dollar for dollar by SRS Distribution, click here

Published at Wed, 13 Sep 2017 16:35:00 +0000