ABC Supply Opens New Branch in California


ABC Supply Opens New Branch in California

ABC Supply Co. Inc. announced that the company has opened a branch in Antioch, Calif. Tom Hennigan will lead the team of associates at this new ABC Supply branch. According to the company, Hennigan joined ABC Supply’s Oakland, Calif., location in 2016 as an outside sales associate. Prior to joining ABC Supply, Hennigan gained extensive experience with exterior building products as a contractor and salesperson, and he will use the industry knowledge he gained to help local contractors find solutions for their business challenges and achieve their goals.

The branch is ABC Supply’s first location in Antioch and one of more than 30 locations in California. “We’re excited to be part of the Antioch community and to build trusting, professional relationships with the area’s contractors,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “Our goal is to make it as easy as possible for contractors to have access to the products and expertise they need to tackle their projects.”

The Antioch branch is located at 2701 Verne Roberts. Branch hours are 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. PDT, Monday through Friday, and 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. PDT on Saturday. The phone number is (925) 779-1437. 

Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 20:35:51 +0000


Low-Rise Adhesive Now Available in Larger Containers


Low-Rise Adhesive Now Available in Larger Containers

Mule-Hide Products Co. now offers Helix Low-Rise Adhesive in 15-gallon pony kegs and 50-gallon drums for use in completing larger jobs. According to the manufacturer, Helix Low-Rise Adhesive provides quick, clean adhesion of approved roof insulations, thermal barriers, cover boards and fleece-backed single-ply membranes to a wide variety of acceptable roofing substrates. The two-component, construction-grade polyurethane foam is applied in a single step, saving crews time and hassle. 

Both parts of the adhesive (Part A and Part B) are ready to use from the container – no mixing required – and are applied simultaneously in a 1:1 ratio through a static mix tip. The adhesive is applied in continuous ribbons or beads spaced 4, 6 or 12 inches apart, depending on the project and code requirements. There is no overspray. The adhesive cures fully in just minutes.
 
A pony keg covers approximately 2,350-7,000 square feet of roof and a drum covers approximately 8,350-25,000 square feet of roof, depending on bead spacing and substrate properties. Containers of Part A and Part B are priced separately but must be purchased as a set.
 
According to the company, the adhesive is odorless and solvent-free and contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), making it crew-, building occupant- and environment-friendly.
 
The adhesive eliminates the need for mechanical fasteners, maintaining a puncture-free vapor retarder, preventing thermal bridging and protecting the structural integrity of the roof deck. The adhesive provides superior wind uplift resistance, allowing it to be used on taller buildings and buildings in higher wind zones. In addition, it provides exceptional hail resistance when used as an adhesive for fleece-backed membranes. 
 
In addition to the pony kegs and drums, Helix Low-Rise Adhesive remains available in cartridge twin-pack tubes (covering approximately 125-400 square feet of roof) and two-tank sets (covering approximately 1,000-3,000 square feet of roof). 

Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 23:00:19 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


New Product Line Secures Rooftop Pipes and Struts


New Product Line Secures Rooftop Pipes and Struts

Green Link has introduced a family of custom-engineered, molded straps and caps for securing pipes and struts for its KnuckleHead rooftop support product line. Straps have been designed for both Heavy Pipe and Strut Support KnuckleHeads, while a cap design was developed for Lite Pipe Supports. All are molded from tough, weatherproof urethane and feature a striking “safety yellow” color.

The Heavy Pipe KnuckleHead strap secures a 3-inch outside diameter pipe, while the Strut Support strap fits steel or aluminum Unistrut-type channel. The Lite Pipe Support cap is designed to secure a single 1-inch nominal pipe or two ½-inch nominal pipes. Pipe supports are attached with standard stainless-steel sheet metal screws, which are supplied with the heads. The Strut Support straps are available in nominal pipe sizes ranging from ¼ inch to 6 inches. Custom straps are available by special order. These elastomeric straps slide into the strut channel and snap in place, eliminating the need for screws.

“We custom engineered these products to fit the unique shape of our head designs,” said Ondrej Pekarovic, Green Link design engineer. “There is growing interest in securing rooftop mechanical installations in the face of high wind conditions and seismic events. These straps will greatly increase the stability of pipes, conduit, channel and related mechanical equipment. Additionally, they satisfy local code requirements.”

Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 13:40:50 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Grupo Resilient International, Inc. Names Julian Lopez to Lead Deployment of Emergency Response & Disaster Recovery Teams


Grupo Resilient International, Inc. Names Julian Lopez to Lead Deployment of Emergency Response & Disaster Recovery Teams

ADDISON, Texas — Grupo Resilient International, Inc., a publicly traded company recently announced that Julian Lopez, a FEMA approved contractor and OSHA instructor, has joined the board of directors of its infrastructure subsidiary, Resilient Infrastructure, Inc. which is currently mobilizing workers for disaster assistance in Houston, Texas and the surrounding areas. GRUI can also mobilize far more workers and equipment under its network of companies which subcontract and offer support services to disaster relief efforts. GRUI is currently deploying workers experienced in demolition, debris-removal, clean-up, waste-hauling and waste disposal.

Additionally, GRUI is also preparing to deploy a network of mobile broadband trailers, “MBT’s” capable of providing gigabit internet speeds to assist and support in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey through its recent investment in Metroplex Networks, Inc. Once GRUI completes deploying the MBT’s and connecting them to a hybrid microwave and fiber-broad backbone to support mission critical communications infrastructure in Houston, GRUI plans to begin re-building critical infrastructure, commercial, retail, industrial and residential buildings affected by Hurricane Harvey. Lopez has extensive expertise and experience gained in disaster recovery, roofing, construction and shoring in the aftermath of Katrina. Lopez said, “We are poised, ready and proud to be able to utilize our past expertise and experience to mitigate the damages and losses to those affected by Harvey.”
 

Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn


Korellis Roofing’s Dedicated Training Center Helps Apprentices Practice and Learn

The training center opened earlier this year for continued development and supplementation of the apprenticeship program.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

After Korellis Roofing sent us some photos of their crews learning in the company’s new training center, we wanted to know more about this great idea. We had a great phone conversation with Dan Stella, Korellis’ workforce development manager, who was hired to run the training center and ensure that the company has the highest skilled workers available.

Stella explained that Korellis Roofing is a union shop and their apprentices don’t often have as much opportunity to learn and install roof details while in the field. By creating the training center and his position as workforce development manager, the apprentices get the chance to learn and practice installing detail work that is often done in the field by the more experienced journeymen.

The facility was created after the company moved its offices into another building on the property. Their first training was held on May 24, and they have held regular trainings since opening the center. Stella says they take advantage of inclement weather when they can’t work out in the field by having the apprentices come into the training center to learn and practice their skills.

The first session held was CERTA training. Stella had taken the NRCA’s Train the Trainer course so he was authorized to teach and certify some crew members not certified in the torch-down work required for a job installation. By performing the CERTA training in the center, Korellis was able to assign more certified torch applicators on the project and complete it ahead of schedule.

Before the company started a Spanish clay tile job, they were able to prepare for it by roofing the steep slope deck in the training center and bringing in Keith Huebner, a local 11 apprenticeship trainer, to assist. Not only was it a good learning experience for the apprentices, it was a nice refresher for the more experienced team as well.

Stella said that the team really appreciates the training opportunities. “I’ll talk to the foreman to see who needs help in what areas and plan related trainings,” said Stella. “In some cases, the workers will reach out to me to ask for help in specific areas that they want to learn more about.”

The plan behind establishing the training facility is to help the roofing jobs be more efficient and smooth. “Practice makes perfect and the training center allows for the roofers to be in a comfortable learning environment,” explained Stella. “By learning inside, they aren’t subject to the pressures of trying to learn in the field while still keeping the job on schedule.”

Do you have a best practice or a unique program that you would like to share with us? Send an email to  info@rooferscoffeeshop.com or use our contact form to tell us about it.

Published at Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:00:27 +0000